Search Results for: sales

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Sales And Retail

Category : Jobs In

Sales and retail industry provides numerous employment opportunities for those searching for jobs, especially young people and students who are interested in working on part time. There are different types of retail outlets and products sold differ. We take a look at sales and retail as well as some of the jobs you can expect to land in the industry.

About Sales and Retail

Both sales and retail are usually described jointly as retail, which is a process concerned with the sale of goods and services to final consumers for profit. Retail is the final step in merchandise chain of distribution and involves sales of merchandise in smaller quantities to end users. There are two main types of retailers, namely: store and non-store retailers. As the name indicates, store retailers sell their merchandise in fixed locations such as stores, while non-store retailers are mobile sellers with virtually no fixed points of sale.

There are many small and large retailers in the United States. Of the ten largest retailers in the world, five are from America. Large retail chains are publicly traded on the U.S. stock exchange. Wal-Mart tops the list of global retailers and is probably the world’s biggest company of any kind. A good number of American retail chains also maintain international presence. Total annual retail sales in the U.S. rose by an average of 4.5 percent between 1993 and 2015, as reported by the Census Bureau. For May 2015, total monthly retail sales of about 3,300 retail chains was put at a little over $443 billion. About two-thirds of the American gross domestic product (GDP) is tied to retail consumption.

Jobs in Sales and Retail

Diverse openings are available in sales and retail and a good number of these are available to first timers and young people looking to work on either part-time or full-time basis. Let’s have a look at some of these jobs.

Sales assistant – Whenever you go to a retail store, you will notice people assisting at the place – these are called sales assistants. You get to assist with smooth operations of a store when offered this position. In addition to making sales, you may be required to perform certain administrative duties as well as do merchandise stocking and ordering.

Retail security – Cases of theft are not rare in retail outlets, particularly the large ones. Retail security helps to guard against these as much as possible by keeping watch over merchandise, customers and staff.

Customer service assistant – Large retail chains do have customer service department where customers’ complaints are attended to. If you possess good customer interaction and communication skills, you might just be able to get a job as a customer service assistant.

Management trainee – You could be considered for the position of a retail manager provided you possess college qualification. But you are likely to start as a trainee to enable you acquire expertise needed for work as a retail manager.

In addition to the foregoing, some other job titles you may be qualified to apply for in sales and retail include:

• Assistant buyer
• Assistant store manager
• Retail sales representative
• Display assistant
• Graphic designer
• Loss prevention specialist
• Marketing specialist
• Warehouse associate
• Cashiers

There you have some of the jobs available in sales and retail. Perhaps, it is relevant to note that a good number of these jobs are offered on part basis.


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Restaurants And Food Services

Category : Jobs In

Restaurants and food services is no doubt one of the fastest growing industries, especially in the United States. More and more people are operating on very busy schedules that leave them little time to prepare food at home. What this means is that restaurants and food services generate millions of jobs as more people use them. The industry is a good one to consider by first-timers for jobs because employers mostly love working with young people.

Industry Overview

All businesses, companies and institutions that are engaged in the preparation and service of food away from the home of customers are encompassed by this industry. These establishments include restaurants, cafeterias, catering operations, hotels and inns. Restaurants and food services have benefited significantly from the hectic lifestyles maintained by most Americans. This industry has been experiencing steady growth for years and looks to continue with that trend in the foreseeable future. Growth of 3.4 percent was recorded in the industry in 2012, according to Vault. This could be considered good news to anyone looking to work in the industry.

The U.S. food system, of which restaurants and food services are a part, was valued at an impressive $1.24 trillion in 2010. Industry sales of slightly over $684 billion were projected for 2014 by the National Restaurant Association. The performance of the food industry is dependent on the state of the economy – when the economy is healthy, people tend to eat out the more. In the U.S., the restaurant industry is the second-largest employer in the private sector. Several thousands of jobs are frequently added and an estimated 1.7 million jobs are expected to be added by year 2025, according to the National Restaurant Association.

Restaurants and Food Services Jobs

The food service industry certainly offers decent job prospect, especially when you consider that less and less people are cooking at home these days. The following are a few samples of the jobs to expect:

Waiter/Waitress – Also known as a server, a waiter or waitress describes menu items to customers, takes orders and serves ordered food. You are expected to ensure that customers feel comfortable and satisfied with the quality of service rendered. Good customer service skills are required to fit in perfectly in this role.

Bus person – This employee is charged with the duty of making sure that dirty dishes are removed between courses. A bus person cleans tables after a set of customers leaves and gets them ready for the next set of patrons. You may also be required to refill glasses when working in this capacity.

Cook – Some employees are more indispensable than others in restaurants and food services – among these are cooks. This class of employees sees to preparation of different types of foods that are served by catering establishments.

In addition to the above, the following are some of the other job titles in restaurants and food services:

• Bartender
• Baker
• Kitchen assistant
• Food service manager
• Expediter
• Chef
• Wine steward
• Kitchen manager
• Washer

Restaurants and food services businesses rank among the leading employers in the U.S. private sector. The only thing is that most jobs you can get as a first timer will likely pay around minimum wage, but that shouldn’t be a significant problem if you do not yet have a dependent.


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Hospitality And Tourism

Category : Jobs In

A career in hospitality and tourism could be a very exciting one. In addition to the fact that many jobs in this industry offers you opportunity to meet many exciting people, they also enable you enjoy certain services that others will need to pay for free of charge. You are especially going to enjoy a career in hospitality and tourism if you find it easy relating with people. In this piece, we provide you an overview of this industry as well as some jobs you can find in it.

Industry Overview

The hospitality and tourism industry is made up of several sectors that are mainly associated with leisure. These include lodging (such as hotels and resorts), tourist destinations, restaurants and commercial food service, event planning, cruise lines, airlines and other forms of transportation. Tourism, which is described as travel for recreation or leisure, is quite popular across the globe today and constitutes a significant source of income for many countries. The industry suffered a significant slowdown during the Great Recession of the late 2000s, but things have since picked up. In 2012, international tourist arrivals surpassed the one billion mark, with China becoming the global leader in terms of spending in international tourism.

The hospitality industry was supposedly worth $6.80 trillion in 2013 and this is predicted to grow at a rate of 4.2 percent through year 2022. Hospitality and tourism industry jobs account for about 10 percent of global jobs – that is quite significant! The total number of these jobs is expected to increase by around 10 percent between 2013 and 2024. Job security is covered in the industry which is said to have the highest growth potential of any industry.

Jobs in Hospitality and Tourism

Hospitality and tourism industry offers many exciting career opportunities in diverse areas, ranging from sales to hotel management and human resources. Here are sample jobs to give you an idea of what you can expect.

Flight attendant – Also called a cabin crew job, this position is one of the most glamorous one in travel and tourism. Your job entails seeing to the welfare of passengers on flights. Working as an airline flight attendant allows you visit many great places across the world free of charge and experience new cultures. You could also meet a good number of popular individuals while on the job.

Waiting staff – You have the option of working in a restaurant or bar, depending on your age. Millions of people work in food service in the United States. Pay for this kind of jobs may be somewhat low, but occasional tips can push your earnings up.

Tour guide – Do you live in the proximity of a popular tourist destination and have a good knowledge of the area? You could serve as a guide to tourists, taking them to must-see places. In addition to making decent pay, you could end up making some great friends in the process as well.

The following are some job titles you may also come across in the hospitality and tourism industry:

* Amusement park attendant
* Information clerk
* Concierge
* Support
* Taxi driver or chauffeur
* Sales or marketing assistant
* Baggage porter
* Hotel reservations agent
* Busser
* Dishwasher
* Events manager
* Travel agent
* Room attendant
* Housekeeper

There are many more jobs you can find on job boards and search engines such as myfirstpaycheck.com/jobs/.

In the past, experience was the most important requirement to work in hospitality and tourism industry. You may need relevant educational qualification as well these days. Most importantly, you must possess great customer skills to flourish in many available positions.


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Student Jobs

There are different reasons why young people look for student jobs. This is usually the case when the allowances or student loans become rather inadequate to cover all those expenses you feel you need to make as a student. Here is a guide on the types of employment you can consider either as a student or a graduate.

Part-time jobs

This is a work-study type of employment. As a matter of fact, part-time jobs are the kind people usually have in focus when talking about student jobs. These jobs allow you have time for your study while at the same time making some money on the side. But you need to endeavor not to lose focus on the main reason you are in school, so you need to cap the number of hours you work a week at a level that will not impact negatively on your study. The number of hours to spare for work per week will fluctuate from time to time as determined by your academic workload.

Here are a couple of the most popular part-time jobs you may consider:

Sitting jobs – People sometimes require the services of a person to help take care of their kids or pets while they are away. A mother could need your help in taking care of her child while she is on a night out. Homeowners may also need someone to look after their pet and/or house while going on a journey. You could make a decent amount, with possible tips, by doing this sort of jobs.

Retail jobs – The retail sector also makes for a great place to look for student jobs. By working as a sales assistant at a retail outlet, your duties will include attending to customers, receiving payments and restocking shelves or freezers. Retail jobs offer flexible working hours, making them great for students. You may also get to enjoy discounts on your own purchases as an employee.

Full-time jobs

These are jobs that require you to work for long hours each day, just like an average employee. Since this type of employment involves you working a full work day every day, it may not be totally correct to describe it as student jobs. The jobs are better suited to graduates who have completed their education.

Internships

Internship refers to a work arrangement by employers that lets students work with them for a short period of time. It could be offered on either a full-time or part-time basis. You may call full-time internships the full-time option of student jobs. This is because they are usually offered during holiday periods and allow you work for long hours each day. Internships enable you gain useful work experience. They could be paid, unpaid or partially-paid openings.

Finding student jobs

You can find different kinds of student jobs on myfirstpaycheck.com/jobs/. You only need to enter the kind of jobs you want in the “What” field and your preferred location in the “Where” field. To further fine tune your search, you can click on Advanced Job Search to specify the name of your preferred company, salary date and time since job posting, among others.

The information provided here should be useful in helping you find desired student jobs that could enable you make extra money and gain useful work experience.


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Learning Another Language: How to Help Yourself Move up the Career Ladder

Category : Other Stuff

There are a number of career benefits associated with learning another language. Read on to learn why taking this step might be the best choice you ever make.

1. It opens up new career options.

Regardless of how many languages you currently speak, adding another to your resume will only open up the job opportunities that are available to you. There are jobs in a variety of fields that look for candidates that speak multiple languages; for example, you may find a position in sales, administration, tourism, banking, communication, teaching, law and transportation. In all of these areas, speaking another language would be of huge benefit to you.

In addition to those career opportunities, there is always a need for translators and interpreters. In fact, The United States Department of Labour believes that these positions will grow more than 40 percent over the next decade. If you speak both English and another language fluently, you may qualify for one of these positions.

The USA itself may be predominantly English based however, there are plenty of other nationalities in the country. Spanish speakers are the second most common behind English ones and if you can Improve Spanish listening and speaking you can greatly improve job opportunities.

2. It makes you more desirable.

If you are interested in a particular job, the fact that you are multilingual gives you a better chance at landing the position. This is true whether the job requires the ability to speak another language or not. While English is the official language of our country, there are a lot of people here that are more comfortable speaking another language. Therefore, almost any company you can think of would benefit from employing someone that is multilingual. In addition, this one skill can help you stand out from a group of other applicants that may be just as qualified as you are otherwise.

A recent study indicated that just over half of all companies that were interested in doing business outside of their own country ran into problems because they did not speak the language. If you have the skill to communicate in these areas, you immediately become an extremely valuable employee. It also provides a bit of job security as well.

3. You can earn more money.

You are often able to command a higher salary if you speak another language in addition to English. In fact, you may be able to earn up to 15 percent more. Depending on your base salary, that extra money could really add up. For example, perhaps it would cover your car payment or pay for a renovation to your kitchen. Or, if you want to have a bit of fun, you may be able to pay for a vacation with the extra funds. In addition, if you are in the military, you could earn an extra $1000 per month if you are multilingual.

4. Knowing a second language improves your cognition.

If you speak another language each day, you can reap a number of cognitive benefits. For example, your memory is better, you can focus on tasks longer, and you are less likely to experience cognitive decline as you age.

Many people are simply too afraid to try and learn another language. They don’t think they have the ability to do it or they are afraid they don’t have enough time to learn. However, all of these are just excuses. You can learn another language if you commit yourself to the process.


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Job Titles

Category : Careers

While it is true that most young people are driven to look for jobs by the lure of extra spending money, the benefits of such jobs do not end there. These jobs could give extra boost when it is time for you to seek admission into college, as some institutions now look beyond just your educational grades. If you are thinking of getting your first job and in need of ideas on what you can do, here we present some job titles, with brief descriptions, to help you decide on what job you can do as a teenager.

Waiter

This sort of worker is charged with the duty of waiting tables in a food service establishment. As a waiter, you ensure that patrons are properly attended and the job can sometimes be a bit hectic. Pay is often below minimum wage, but tips usually make up for that.

Babysitter

A popular work option for teens, babysitting is ideal for someone who loves young children, more suitably for females. A babysitter takes care of kids while their parents are away, with duties including feeding, bathing and changing diapers.

Housekeeping assistant

You could get a job of housekeeping assistant in a hotel and your main duty entails keeping rooms tidy at all time. This sort of worker performs tasks such as vacuuming and washing of linens. Opportunity for tips also exists here.

Personal assistant

This job involves you providing different types of services to an older person. These services include running errands and doing any other tasks that the person you work with finds comfortable assigning to you.

Tutor

There are certainly one or two things that you can teach someone else by working as a tutor. You could take up the job of teaching a younger person a subject you are good at or teaching how to play an instrument, among others.

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Mover

Local packing and moving companies usually need young people to assist them with moving stuffs every now and then. If you are willing to flex your muscles a bit, this job might just do it for you.

Busser

In some very busy restaurants, teens are usually needed to work as busboy or busgirl, in addition to waiters. A busser is responsible for clearing away dirty dishes, setting tables and assisting a waiter or waitress in any other way.

Dog walker

Teens also do well as dog walkers, whose primary duty it is to ensure that canines get enough exercise. You will also often be responsible for feeding and watering dogs under your care.

Care giver

As a teenager, you could find job as a care giver for sick or elderly people. You will be charged with the responsibility of running errands for these people and probably also ensuring that they take their medications as due as well as other relevant tasks.

Bagger

Chances are that you have seen some workers bagging items at a local grocery store – they are very likely baggers. Other duties of a bagger, a role you may be able to apply for if you at least 14 years, includes welcoming customers and helping load groceries onto carts.

Stocker

This is another job you can get in a grocery store. A stocker’s work is to ensure that products are taken from where they are stored and arranged neatly on shelves. It is a good job for an introvert teen.

Car wash attendant

Your local car wash may need extra hands, especially in the summer months. Depending on your age and height, you could get the job of an attendant helping out with car washing. There is opportunity for getting tips in addition to your circa minimum wage earning.

Warehouse worker

Job opportunities exist for teenagers to assist with loading and unloading in warehouses and distribution centers. This sort of job is a great recommendation for those looking to work their muscles.

Animal shelter worker

If you are the kind of person that really loves having animals around, the job of an animal shelter worker might just be perfect for you. The job can be done on part-time basis and mostly involve taken care of animals and cleaning their enclosures. But be aware that you may be called to help out with putting sick animals to sleep – something you might not have the heart to stand.

Lawn care worker

This job entails helping those who are too busy to take care of their gardens and lawns. A lawn care worker helps to mow lawns, cut grasses and trim hedges ensuring the greenery looks pleasant to the eyes. There is opportunity of making good money if you are diligent at your work.

 

Newspaper delivery person

Teenagers have been doing newspaper delivery for a very long time and it remains a good job for extra spending money today. The job is pretty simple: just pick up the newspapers from the distribution centers and go place them at the doorsteps of subscribers.

Lifeguard

If you a good swimmer, this job may be perfect fit for you. A lifeguard helps to ensure that people are safe at swimming pools and beaches by keeping them from drowning. Aside the pay, this job offers you opportunity to make new friends.

Pizza delivery worker

The job of delivering pizzas is one you could consider if you love driving around. It gives a bit of freedom to enjoy yourself while making deliveries and you can also get tips every now and then. But this job is a bit hazardous in that delivery workers are occasionally assaulted or robbed.

Web designer

This job is good for those teens with expertise in designing websites and in need of part-time jobs. Web designers are well paid and you have the flexibility of working in a company or on a freelance basis via sites such as oDesk.

Data entry worker

Businesses often need people to help them gather and enter information into databases. For example, the job of a data entry worker could entail searching on the Internet for information and entering same into a spreadsheet or via a web interface.

Camp counselor

Extra hands are usually required to assist with activities during camping programs, which are especially more common in the summer months. Teenagers are brought on to guide younger children or help in any other way as the needs arise.

Sales associate

Sales associates or clerks help out with sales in retail stores. They advise customers on available products while making recommendations. The pay for a sales clerk is around minimum wage, but the job offers a good means of improving your people skills.

Product demonstrator

It is possible that you have seen people handling out samples at your local grocery store before and wonder what it would be like to be in their position. Those people are product demonstrators and you can work as one, even though you are a teenager. Average duties include ensuring cleanliness of the demonstration area, setting up products for demonstration and getting customers to try out samples to induce them into making a purchase.

Amusement park attendant

Amusement parks have predilection for hiring teenagers to work for them, possibly because their main customers are also young people. Your job as an amusement park attendant will usually involve helping out visitors, providing directions or information and ensuring that nobody is at risk of getting injured.

Dishwasher

This position is self-explanatory by merely looking at the job title. Big and busy restaurants require services of more than just waiters and bus persons. Dishwasher help to ensure that dirty dishes are properly washed, rinsed, and arranged in appropriate places.

 

There you have just some of the job titles that young people can consider taking up. These jobs and some other ones can easily be found on MyFirstPaycheck.com, if available. All you need do is to enter the job title you prefer and search for available openings. Being a teen, it may be advisable for you to search for only those jobs that are close to where you live – you can do this by entering your preferred location in the provided field. You can even refine your search further by using the full-time, part-time, internship, freelance and temporary filters.

The experience gained, in addition to wages, at these jobs can come in quite handy when applying to other jobs in the future or trying to gain admission into college. However, before thinking of taking up any of these or other jobs for teenagers, make sure that you are qualified for such by first consulting the child labor laws in your state.



Image: Flickr


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A potato with a message makes a great gift. This potato says: You're a strong independent potato who needs no man

Mail a Potato With Your Message

What’s The Mail A Potato Thing?

MysterPotato.com is the premier seller in the hot mail a potato category. Mailing a potato has been a small hit for around a year now and really caught attention in social media in 2015 as a couple websites including Potato Parcel and Potato Express received positive press as amazing money makers. All the while MysteryPotato.com has held the market niche by capturing the intrigue of the potato coming in the mail. The real amazing thing is that your potato message makes it to your recipient without their knowledge.

For just $9.99 you can order a large potato sent to anyone in the USA or Canada. You get to Personalize the Potato and if you like, it can be sent anonymously. This opens up all sorts of opportunities to send messages to loved ones and distasteful ones alike. It allows for inside jokes and for crushes to be explored and enhanced. If you have someone in mind for which you would like to mail a potato, this is a great time to get it in the mail with MysteryPotato.com.

Potato Parcels

Shipping is fast and you can choose the unboxing experience of your recipient… everything from a bareback potato with postage straight on the potato to a premium boxed unwrap experience are available. Clearly the premium experience makes the most sense for those you want to compliment or express your admiration for. The premium experience will surprise, delight, and in a way, confuse the recipient into a unique experience that only you can provide. The bareback potato is suited far better for those who you want to send a potato without the fanfare. Perhaps delivering a stern or undesirable message to. These are all good reasons to mail a potato.

MysteryPotato.com’s potato parcel also comes in seasonal varieties depending on the time of year. For example, the following are extremely popular message potatoes:

  • Halloween Potato: Halloween is a cherished holiday all across the United States and Canada. Mystery Potato provides ghost and pumpkin potatoes.
  • Christmas Tree Potato: In the Christmas season shipping potatoes becomes a festive affair with the green potato covered in lights.
  • Easter Potato: Mystery Potato takes it to another level of pastel in the spring when they mail a potato colored according to traditional spring pastels. Hide these in your yard for the kids to find 🙂
  • Fourth of July Potato: Jeff’s favorite holiday, this message potato comes just at the right time to be colored red, white, and blue. Put your personalized potato message on it and you can celebrate the fireworks with a spud.

Glitter Bomb

MysteryPotato.com also offers other mailed products for your friends and enemies such as:

  • Glitter Bombs
  • Baby Potatoes
  • Red Potatoes
  • Aphrodisiacs

All in all this is a fantastic resource for sending a really fun and confusing item in the mail. Many people are raving about the intrigue delivered by Mystery Potato over other sites. Customer Service is also excellent. Check out MysteryPotato.com next time you need to mail a potato.

How The business Works

This business is really a small eCommerce company in the gag-gift category. It has a group of simple products that are unique and highly personal. It has a sales channel in it’s website and social media presence. It has the need to personalize, fulfill, and ship just like any other eCommerce retailer. It needs to purchase inventory and supplies and maintain stock levels.

If you are a teen who wants to start a business be sure to get in contact with us. We know how to help you get started!


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Jobs in New York

Category : Job Search

Are you a college graduate and interested in entry-level jobs in New York? If yes, you would be pleased to learn that there are diverse opportunities and openings available for college graduates. Information technology, marketing, finance and health are few of the industries with the highest number of these opportunities. Here are some of the best entry-level jobs for college graduates.

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Biotechnology

Category : Jobs In

Biotechnology refers to the use of biological or living organisms and systems to fabricate new products, which are mostly biopharmaceutical drugs. It is often seen as overlapping with bioengineering, biomedical engineering and related fields. The biotechnology industry has witnessed significant growth in the last few years and that trend looks set to continue for years to come. This post provides useful information about the biotech industry and some job titles you may be eligible for as a first-timer.

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The Challenges of Managing Mobile Workspaces for Businesses

Category : Other Stuff

As the internet continues to revolve inevitably the workforce will become far more mobile. We are already witnessing employees craving this flexibility and stepping away from the usual “9-5” momentum. Technology such as Google docs, Cloud hosting and Skype bridge the gap closer together.

The questions employers have to ask themselves “will the modern workplace be in a traditional office or at an employee’s home?” Unfortunately there is no simple answer.
If we take a look at Google’s plans for their new office in London due to be completed in the year 2016, the office space is out of this world. They will hold approximately one million square feet and it will house an indoor football pitch, an open-air swimming pool, a roof garden and a climbing wall. Who would want to work from home when they have all this in their workplace? Google are advertising this as an extension to their company culture.

office

Admittedly we don’t all have the budget to create the workplace of tomorrow, but fear not as there are plenty of humble ways to re-create the workspace of the future. If we think about it we have all seen how technology has changed the way we life but hard assets such as cars and offices have somehow remains stagnant over the years – it is time to change this.

Many companies understand the frustration of remote workers especially when they struggle to get access to adequate space, amenities and networking opportunities. This is why more and more companies are giving their remote employees the option to “hot desk”. Hot desking offers co-working spaces complete with on-site amenities such as meeting rooms, refreshments and printing facilities. It is a proven fact these hot desks inspire and benefit creativity, innovation and collaboration.

The type of worker suited for remote working

The target audience for remote working is someone that is tech savvy and is career focused. This will be more common when Generation Z (individuals aged 13-18) enter the workforce. Did you know that those considered Generation Z spend almost every waking hour on the internet? They are surrounding by social media and eat and breathe the internet.

Due to this mobile working will only grow in the upcoming years. In fact there are plenty of reports to suggest that the mobile workforce will grow to over 1.3 billion by the end of 2015. The reported figure by IDC was just over one billion in 2010.

We take a look at how employers can manage their mobile workspace and consider whether employers are ready for the future:

IS THE STRATEGIC VISION OF THE COMPANY A FLEXIBLE ONE?

As an employer do you have the same mind-set of Google and consider your workplace to be an extension of your corporate ethos and strategy? Ericsson predicts that in the year 2020 there will be over 50 billion devices connected to the world wide web. Employers need to start thinking now how these connected devices will change the way we communicate and work and a company’s vision needs to be ready to welcome these changes. Alternative Networks showcase some of the services to look out for.

DO YOU RECOGNIZE THAT A FLEXIBLE WORKPLACE IS MUCH MORE THAN A PERK?

Employers need to change their mind-set and recognize that flexibility is not a perk but a strategy for success. Companies all over the world have witnessed how flexible working has improved motivation, efficiency levels and profit margins. Employees want to work for a company where they feel trusted and valued.

It is important to note that any change is corporate culture including changes in workspaces will require a set of policies and training guidelines. Any changes need to be communicated well in advance to allow time for employees to understand the changes and to ask any emerging questions they may have.

The ability to utilize flexible workspaces will also be based on the role they have. We have previously mentioned there are plenty of tools such as Google Docs and Cloud to enable employees to work from a remote destination but this would not enable a sales person or someone who has regular contact with clients to carry out their role effectively.

Employers must also consider the social aspects of remote workers. Lone workers as they are commonly referred to can feel isolated at times especially if they have no contact with other colleagues. It is important to get them involved with the company culture as much as possible.

As an employer how do you see your workspace evolving? Is it something you have yet to consider?


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How to Find a Seasonal Winter Job

Category : Job Search

With Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays around the corner, we are into that period when many people are interested in how to find a seasonal winter job. Seasonal jobs, by definition, are jobs that last for a short period of time. They constitute good means for companies to temporarily add to their staff strength during peak seasons. While a seasonal job may appear unattractive by their description, it could actually be helpful in helping you land a permanent position, and the period from Thanksgiving to Christmas is replete with such jobs. If you are interested in having one, here is how to find a seasonal winter job.

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Advice Survey Results

Advice Survey Results

Welcome to the survey section of myfirstpaycheck.com where you can find advice from experienced members of the workforce or contribute your own.


Justin Guerra’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Selling newspapers

How did you find that first job?
Through an ad in the newspaper

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Location, distance from home, and hours of work.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
Be polite. Be respectful. Dress nice.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It helped me gain experience and learn what is expected in a workplace

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Have a positive attitude. You might not get hired with the first 5 or even 10 applications, but stay in there. Good things happen to those who wait.


Julie Lynn Hohnecker’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Lawn Mowing

How did you find that first job?
Neighbors and my parents.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Networking with other teenagers and family friends.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
To be honest and don’t be afraid to ask questions.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It helped me to be a better person by knowing that I am doing and helping someone else because they are too old to do it themselves.


J. Pelley’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Bailing and stacking hay

How did you find that first job?
My neighbor asked me to help him when I was done bailing my own hay.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Distance, hours, income

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
Make a good first impression. Dress well, not grungy.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
Discipline and endurance.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Don’t try to go for a job you’ve got no chance of getting.


Anonymous’ Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Babysitting

How did you find that first job?
I set out on my street and told all of my neighbors that I was starting a babysitting service and everything took off from there

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Ask yourself, do you enjoy doing this job? Do you make enough money? Is it worth it?

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
The first impression means everything, don’t be late.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
This job has helped me become more responsible.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Think outside the box


Austin’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Yard Work

How did you find that first job?
My older brother worked for a man that my dad works with and still does, my brother worked for him for many years and decided to quit because he found a real job and he asked if I would take his place and after thinking about it, I did.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
You should be careful on the type of job like if you want to make smoothies for a job than you should make sure that they have a good business report and would be in the right level for you to be working in.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
Make sure that you are going to be able to answer the questions given without thinking about them for a while, and speak clearly so they know who there hiring.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
I found that as I got older you are able to interact with that person easier and are able to get the job done and right to make that person happier, and the more work that you do may be hard but after words it would have really been worth it. As you get older you’ll be able to find better ways to spend and more importantly save the money you have made.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
I would definitely try to find a job some where close to home and as you work try to interact with the person you are working with and be positive!


Clorissa’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Babysitting

How did you find that first job?
My mom helped me find jobs.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Don’t give out your information without permission, and if your only a teen, bring an adult with you. Another important thing to remember is body language.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
You should know a lot about the job before you go into it because it might be something you are not capable of.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It taught me some responsibility.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Use good body language and stay in school for any job/career you want. Trust me, school gets you really far in life.


SJ’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Mowing Grass

How did you find that first job?
Through family and friends

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Make eye contact, stand straight, and smile.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
Speak fluently and don’t yell.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It taught me patience.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Do not whine when you don’t get the job you want.


Alisha’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
I worked on an animal farm

How did you find that first job?
I heard about the job from a friend.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Make sure the work is something you are familiar with.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
Make eye contact.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
This job helped make me more responsible in a lot of ways

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Look for a job that your kind of familiar with


Haley’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Babysitter

How did you find that first job?
My aunt was looking for someone to babysit my four cousins so I decided to help.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Make sure you know what the pay and hours are for the job.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
Having a job prepares me for life

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Do your best


George S.’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Intern at engineering firm

How did you find that first job?
Pure luck! My mother was working at a bookstore, and the director of this firm purchased the exact stack of books that I had purchased the previous week. My mother commented on the coincidence, the man offered his business card, and the following week, I had an interview.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Have an open mind!

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Remember the motto of the British Special Air Services: PROPER PLANNING PREVENTS PISS POOR PERFORMANCE. Plan ahead, get there early, and know what you’re walking into.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Even though I will never pursue engineering, the skills I learned at the firm have taught me to think visually, spatially, and mathematically.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
HAVE CONFIDENCE! DO NOT BE AFRAID TO ASK QUESTIONS! THERE ARE NO “STUPID QUESTIONS”


Karyn’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Waitress

How did you find that first job?
I spoke to people at a locally owned little restaurant

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Location (since being on time is really important, and as a teenager I didn’t have my own car when I got my first job) Location (since being on time is really important, and as a teenager I didn’t have my own car when I got my first job) Impressions are really important, dress appropriately, and if you are going to inquire about a job, timing is important…so at a restaurant don’t ask to talk to a manager about a job during a really busy Friday night. When filling out an application make sure you write very carefully (best hand writing and no mistakes).

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Have some knowledge about the company you want to work at, be ready for them to ask you popular questions (like identify a weakness) and be prepared to frame your answers in a way that puts a good spin on it. Also it’s a good idea to think about what question(s) you might want to ask them, because many employers will ask you if you have questions. Punctuality is essential – don’t be late…especially for an interview or your first day. Don’t be afraid to ask questions if you don’t understand something.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Learning how to work with people, and in a restaurant serving people, gave me an understanding for the food business that I still find useful today. When the money you make is directly affected by the work of other people (tips aren’t so good when things are going wrong) you learn to pitch in and help wherever you can. I also think it helped me to multitask and have a good memory, I would suggest that everyone works in the food service industry at some point, it’s a good experience.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Do your homework, look around, and be prepared for it not to be what you expect. People have an average of 7 job changes in their lives, so your first job is most likely not going to be your last. Try to stick it out, and remember that your experiences (good or bad) will follow you when you leave.


Katherine’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Toy Store Clerk

How did you find that first job?
I called the toy store.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Don’t dress messy.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
No, i was fired after 2 weeks

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Don’t dress messy. Be on time.


Sam Blum’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Cold Stone Creamery

How did you find that first job?
I went out and filled out a bunch of applications. Cold Stone called me first, so I took it.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Keep an open mind.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Don’t be nervous. If you’ve gotten the interview, or it’s your first day, your employer thinks you can take on the job. Stay confident, be friendly, and most importantly, be yourself.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
My co-workers have become my great friends. It was my first “adult” experience, as I was able to take on new challenges, try new things, and have a great time making money.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Apply everywhere you can, you can always turn someone down. I got my job before my first paycheck, but if I was first looking now, Myfirstpaycheck.com would be a really great place to start.


Nita’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
baby sitting

How did you find that first job?
asked by a friend

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
find people you can trust and display good work ethic themselves

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
relax, dress nice but comfortably, smile, lean forward, shake hands, be pleasant

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
I love kids and liked finding work involving children… I got a good recommendation too.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Find work that you like so you look forward to going to work.


Lois’ Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
I worked at Pretzel Time in the mall

How did you find that first job?
My friends and I were mall rats. Most of us had jobs at various stores in the mall so we knew the managers and other employees.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
What kind of person do you want to work for? What kind of people do you want to work with?

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Know where you need to go and how to get there, know the dress code, ask questions when you don’t know something.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
The networking I did from that job helped me get jobs for the next four years (even in another city when I went away to college). I still use the networking skills I gained at that job.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Be okay starting at the bottom and working your way up…almost everyone has to do it. Have fun with your job and have fun with the people you work with.


Alberto’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Bagger/Cashier- Acme Supermarket

How did you find that first job?
I decided to get a job last summer, and I applied to Acme online. They called me back several weeks later.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Employers love to here from you. If you apply, wait a week, and then call them back “regarding your application”, it let’s them know that you are confident and assertive. Don’t, however, take this to the extreme and call the day after you apply.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Interview etiquette is pretty straight forward. Be polite, but make sure they know they can’t take advantage of you. Make sure you fully understand the job guidelines as well as the salary you are going to receive.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
If you’re looking for a summer job: -apply early and to many different places, because EVERYBODY is applying at the same time. I recommend starting in March or April. I waited, and I missed about a month of the summer going through the process instead of making money. -Pretty much nobody except beaches and pools wants a worker who will only stay for the summer. They won’t hire you unless you commit for at least through the fall.


Doug’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Fuel Transfer Technician (gas pumper)

How did you find that first job?
I looked on www.myfirstpaycheck.com. Just kidding! That website was just a glimmer in the eye of a bunch of Lavins at that time. The truth is that a kid on my basketball team was quitting and so I took his spot when he left.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Make sure that the job will help you achieve some definite goals, whether they be developing new skills, gaining experience, making money, or whatever. Try to get a job where you are surrounded by a good team of people that will help you and encourage you.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Bring phone numbers for your references. I always forget that one!

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
Being a gas pumper at Sunoco? Hmmm. It’s made me want to ride a bicycle everywhere I go. That’s good, right?

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Go for the gusto. Be bold. Be Sincere.


Max’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Waiter

How did you find that first job?
I was walking around and saw a help wanted sign

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
To be open and not to critical

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Be polite, neat, respectful, and try to not to be nervous and freak out

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
My first job I had a boss who was a an incredibly unhappy person who was always riding me and my fellow employees, working there helped me learn to deal with that kind of situation.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Don’t be to critical, never feel trapped, never work for an establishment that treats you terribly dont be afraind to stick up for yourself


AL in DC’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Receptionist

How did you find that first job?
The easy way, I got a job at my father’s office when I was 16 year old.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
It is important to come to an interview ready to ask questions. Now that I am in a position to hire people, much of my evaluation of candidates’ question about the company and the job.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Before you start ask questions about dress code. Don’t make the mistake of dressing at the lower end of the dress code. Your dress tells your colleagues a great deal about how seriously you take yourself and your job.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
I was lucky that in my first few jobs I worked for people who felt it was their responsibility to teach me good skills and habits. My first boss told me that I should begin to straighten my desk when the clock struck 5 o’clock and not a moment before. I should actively work and not appear to be waiting to race from the office.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Keeping knocking on doors. Job hunting is depressing and discouraging until the day you get the job. You forget the tough times immediately.


Susan Kilborn’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Assistant in the local public library

How did you find that first job?
I was in the library alot and asked if they needed summer help.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Try to think what you like to do most and try to get a job doing that or around other people who are doing it in a support capacity. Persistence is almost always a winner. Keep checking back, dropping by and emailing the place where you really WANT to work. Once you get a job there, ask for help. Ask for feedback. Ask for more responsibility if you see an opportunity for it. Work and SMILE.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
I jumped the gun and answered this one up above.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
I still love libraries.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Ask questions. Try to learn something about the place where you work before you get there. such as asking for the roster of personnelle so you can start learning the names of the people who work there. Volunteer for work if you don’t have anything to do. Don’t just sit there!


Emily’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Tennis instructor

How did you find that first job?
through my tennis coach

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
make sure you do something you love

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
dress professionally, arrive early

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It taught me discipline

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Do your research!


Steve in Seattle’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Window Washer

How did you find that first job?
I teamed up with a buddy and we brought squeegee’s and soap and a bucket to an outdoor strip mall and told each store that we were real experienced, and finally an art store hired us on a regular basis. I think we got a couple more stores, and after a couple weeks we actually got pretty good at window washing.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
If you depend on walking or bicycling, or the bus or mom & dad to drive you, consider the convenience of the place you are selecting. Pay attention to the workers already there who you might have to work with. You might ask them, without letting the boss hear you, how long they have worked there, and do they like it. If you sense that three or four people have recently left, and that everyone there is somewhat new, then the “turn over” is high, and the boss might be a grouch, or expect more work out of you than what the job desciption says.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Well, I am no longer a teen. But I was a teen once. I would suggest making a great first impression on the one in charge of hiring you. Give them eye contact and a firm handshake, and try not to look down like you are shy or frightened, even if you are. If they ask your name, say it clearly as though you are proud of your name. And yes, dress a bit fancier than what will be expected if hired. You can always roll up your sleeves when they get comfortable with you, but if you start out dressed too casual, it is hard to become more formal at that point. The hardest part of an interview in your situation might be if your future boss decides to engage you in small talk, such as, “How about those Eagles?” or…”What music do you listen to?” It can get tricky, but just be aware in advance that you might have to say something about sports or music or a certain movie or TV show. I would advise you to pretend to first take interest in what team or TV show your future boss likes, then agree with their taste, or say, “My parents like the same thing you do.” It is less about what you answer, than how. Grown-ups just want to feel like their teen employees will be able to carry on an intelligent conversation, and not steal from them. If the interviewer says anything that seems the slightest bit inappropiate or too personal, remember not everything is their business, and it would be best to politely excuse yourself and look for work elsewhere.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?Regardless of your age, the bottom line is you are costing your boss money if you get hired. They have something you want, or need, and it pays to smile and be respectful to them.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
If you are handed a job application, offer three or more “character” references, as you will not yet have any job references. The best character references come from local business owners, politicians, priests, rabbis, and ministers, who are well established. Perhaps you are regular customers at a local grocery store, car repair place, or nursery, and have gone in with your mother or father, or friend. Or a dentist, or alderman is your neighbor, and you go to school with their kids. You can ask them permission to put their name and business/occupation and number down on your job application. It really “beefs it up,” and, again, gives the impression you are honest, not spacy, and won’t take drugs…the stuff older folks who own businesses have concerns about when they think “teen.”


Ari S’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Working at the Narberth Cheese Company as a sales associate.

How did you find that first job?
All I did was walk around town and look for “Help Wanted” signs. When you see them, I went into the store and asked for an application.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?

  1. Location: It has to be easy and cheap for you to get to.
  2. Your Commitment: You have to know how much time you are able to work and be honest about it.
  3. Your Capability: Can you see yourself working at the place you are applying? Meaning is it over your head or not, and are you able to stand doing it You don’t have to like it, but that would be a plus. Also, when you go to ask for an application it would be great if you did not look like a slob. First impressions are key.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Once again, don’t look like a slob when you go to the interview. If you feel like it, dress up a little…it never hurts. And for the first day (and maybe even first month) don’t get hung up on little things that you mess up. You’re new, you’ll be corrected, and then you move on.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?The Cheese Company has been a great experience for me. In fact, I’m still there (I’ve only been there for a year though). I do everything from sales, to inventory, to janitor…ing. I have met a lot of people and learned about many things, not all of which are about cheese.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?

  1. If you are applying for the summer, don’t wait until the end of school.
  2. Most places will require working papers, so get those from your school’s main office or guidance office.
  3. Be practical about where you are going to work
  4. Not to sound too lame, but try to have a little fun with it…if that’s at all possible.

Mark’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
I taught swimming to kids at the local YMCA.

How did you find that first job?
The assistant coach to my high school swim team worked there.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?

  1. Find a job that you can get to without relying on someone else.
  2. It’s your first job, not a career. So, although it’s always best to do something interesting, don’t sweat it if it’s not.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?

Interview:

  1. Be serious, but also yourself at the interview. They’re usually more interested in whether you’ll fit in than whether you know how to do the job, especially when we’re talking first job-type stuff like cashier, line cook, etc.
  2. Dress to impress. You should be dressed about one notch fancier than what you would actually wear to the job.

First day:

  1. Show up early. It shows you’re responsible and gives you time to get the lay of the land.
  2. Dress to impress. Just like #2 above. It shows you’re serious. You can dress down on your second or third day.

Employment:

Remember, the reason it’s called work and it’s something you’re paid to do is because it’s not always fun. Even rock stars hate their jobs some days.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?

Teaching is actually something I’ve done on and off ever since my first job. So I guess that I lucked out and found something that I really enjoy doing.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?

Pound the pavement and don’t be disappointed if you get turned down the first few times.


Ari’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Working at Thrift Drug as a cashier
How did you find that first job?
I walked around looking for summer jobs until I found it.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
As a teen? Get as much money as you can because anything you do will be fairly dull.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Make sure you are clean and well dressed, always be enthusiastic about everything

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
Back then I learned how to deal with customers and today, I still deal with them, only now, I call them clients.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
At this young age, follow the money.


Ronn’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
McDonald’s Cashier

How did you find that first job?
I walked in and asked them if they hired 14-year-olds (Nowhere else did)

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Are you going to be able to be cheerful at the job? How badly do you need the money? Could you get something better? Remember, this isn’t a career.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Try to seem independent, despite being dependent on your parents. Just act intelligent. A place like McDonalds doesn’t care about your skills or anything.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
I know I never want to work as a cashier. I value money in terms of hours of McDonalds work now.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Your best bet as someone with no experience is to get a job through a relative.


Josh’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Soccer Referee

How did you find that first job?
A friend of mine was doing it, and I asked him how I could get involved

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
You’ve got to be realistic about logistics, including how many hours you can work (and want to work). It’s nice to make money, but you if you spend all of your time in school and then at work, you’re going to miss out on a lot of enjoyment. Remember, the older you get, the more you end up working and you have less time for yourself.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Take everything seriously. Employers look for maturity and a sense of responsibility.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
As a referee you take a lot of criticism, no matter how good you are. It was important for me to learn how to take criticism (even though it may not be constructive). I also learned to stay confident in the face of criticism.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Find something you like to do or are interested in and see if there is any way to get paid while being involved in it. For me, I loved playing soccer, so I looked for ways to get paid while being around the game. If you get into the habit of working for money, you will always just be working for money. But if you get into the habit of getting paid for doing what you like to do, you will end up much happier.


Austin’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Mowing Lawns and Shoveling Snow

How did you find that first job?
Went to neighbors who I knew, talked to my parents friends, friend’s parents, anywhere where I could walk

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?

It’s important to find something that you enjoy because it’ll make working easier. I liked being outside and having control of my own hours so landscaping was never hard.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?

Show them that you want the job, and be capable of your own abilities. Most kids have worked in some capacity; babysitting, petsitting, yardwork, etc. remember that you are capable of handling the responsibility, and than make sure you do a good job.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It helped me get the next job and the job after. I was able to take on a big landscaping project for a neighbor and a friend that involved multiple days and hiring my brothers, but I knew I could do the job, and I could it cheaper than a professional landscaper. I was also able to use that experience to obtain my first salaried position, at a plant nursery.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Be persistent. If you aren’t getting rejected, you’re not trying hard enough.


Nick’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Receptionist at a Law Firm

How did you find that first job?
A friend of the family worked there

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
It’s important to remember how the expenses of getting to the job, etc, are going to effect the amount of $ you take home – for example, one place may pay more than another, but it’s so far away that the expenses of the commute kind of even the salaries out.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
If you act like you don’t want to be there, you’re not going to be there for long.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It’s helped me realize that I never want another job that requires me to answer phones with the same line, all day long.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
You’re probably not going to get a job that you actually like – welcome to the world of work.


Bracha’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Working at the Mall of America for Gapkids (and spending all of the money I made at gap–great discount!)

How did you earn that first job?
I knew a friend that had started there so i was able to get an interview

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
It’s important to know how you’ll get there and back every shift, if you will be able to work the number of hours you want, if you will be able to make “enough” money, how the boss is, how the staff is, the perks, etc.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
It’s important to present yourself well, which usually means dressing up a little bit, not chewing gum, cell phone off. It’s important to maintain open communication so if you have a question about the first day, or any day, that you ask your supervisor. Better to ask than to try to figure it out yourself

How has that job helped you as you grew older?
It helped me get my second job, which helped me get my third job, etc. also, I think that at some point everyone should work in the service industry (retail, restaurants, theme parks) because even though people can get rude, if you can handle the crowd you can handle any assignment further down the line.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for their first job?
Use any connections from friends or family members that you might have (or websites that cater to first time employees!), don’t get discouraged if not everyone is hiring, or they do not hire you. Find the places that are hiring, drop off applications, ask when you should expect a call, and follow up by that time by calling to talk to the manager.



Image: Flickr


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Job Resources for Teens

Category : My First Job

Finding a job can be hard, but knowing the laws behind working can be even harder. Myfirstpaycheck.com is here to help.

While every state has slightly similar regulations, the following are some links from the federal department of labor that provide a good overview.

Check them out for more information, and remember you don’t have to stay in a job that makes you feel uncomfortable or work for a boss that makes you feel uneasy.

The following laws are meant to protect you. Make sure you know your rights.

  • Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA): General overview and help Navigating DOL Laws and Regulations
  • Youth in the Workplace: More specific information regarding child labor regulations and helpful shortcuts.
  • YouthRules! This department of Labor’s initiative seeks to promote positive and safe work experiences for young workers.

More specific subtopics for further investigation:



Image: Flickr


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Summer Jobs For High School Students

Category : My First Job

Teenagers Summer Job Opportunity

During the summer months there are lots of jobs that open up for teenagers who are interested in making some extra money of the upcoming school year. There are lots of different types of jobs that high school students can find that require little to no work experience.  These jobs are not only great for students to make a little extra cash, but for students to get some valuable work experience before they graduate and head to college or start their careers.

Available jobs in Retail outlets:

Some of the jobs available to teens these days are in the malls in retail outlets in larger cities. Malls are filled with up to a few hundred stores of all different kinds, so there are usually many part-time jobs available within one mall area.  These jobs can include retail sales positions, working waiting tables or busing tables at a restaurant, being a barista at a coffee shop or working behind these scenes at clothing or shoe stores stocking and restocking items.  There are also usually movie theatres in larger malls that need people to sell tickets, concessions and to clean up after the movie guests have come and gone to watch their movie. So no matter what you are interested in, there are usually positions available for students to work.

Seasonal job opportunity:

Also during the summer seasonal opportunities open up for teens interested in starting work.  There are usually lifeguard positions open at outdoor pools, beaches and lakes through the city parks and recreational department as well as through private clubs.  During the summer many restaurants and cafes experience an increase in business because they are either located mainly outside or cater to summer tourists.  And, in a lot of cities, there are summer concert or events series that need staff to help run the events and concerts.  By simply asking around and looking at job posting boards teens can usually find something that they think is interesting and can fit their schedules.

If teens are interested in exploring a position that they think may fit in with a career they would one day want to pursue, then thinking about doing a summer internship that is either paid or unpaid could be a viable option for high school students as well.  There are thousands of internship programs available to students, and companies are usually very excited to be teaching their skills and life passion with an eager young student.  And sometimes, if the student like the field that they have chosen to have the internship in and the company is impressed with the student’s skills, then sometimes that internship can turn into a job for that student down the road sooner than he or she may think.

So, no matter what you are interested in and how much you would like to spend of your summer between classes working, there is usually a job available for you that will fit your schedule.  Just make sure to plan ahead and don’t give up searching until you find something that you enjoy.

 



Image: Flickr


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Part Time Jobs For Teens

Category : Job Search

Greeting Everyone to the Resource Center of Jobs For Teens

If you are in high school chances are that you wish you had some extra cash.  And when you are in high school, a little extra cash can go along way.  So, if you think that you have time in your busy schedule to start a part time job, its best to start looking now.

“Read More”

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Summer Jobs For Teens

Category : My First Job

Summer Jobs For Teens

It’s the time of year when many teenagers start thinking about summer employment. Besides putting a few dollars into your pocket, a job can be a great way to make new friends, learn new skills, and get out of the house. What should you do when the final bell rings in June? Here are some ideas for you to ponder as you make the move towards a summer job.

Lifeguard: This is the quintessential summer job, and for good reason. You’ll spend all day outside, and if it’s too hot you can jump into some cold water for a dip. In many cases, the pay is quite good as well, coming in at a few dollars higher than minimum wage. Keep in mind, however, that this job comes with a whole bunch of responsibility—take a look at the name, for goodness’ sake! You’ll have to take a course to learn CPR and rescue techniques, and if something does go wrong, you’ll be the one taking care of it.

Golf Caddy: If you’re in good shape (or looking to get into good shape), you can do a lot worse than a summer spent caddying. Carrying bags will build your muscles, and if you do a good job, you can usually expect a decent tip at the end of the day. Just be prepared to walk quite a bit, and if you plan on moving to the front of the line, you’ll want to brush up on your golf knowledge.

Food Service: Whether you’re working at McDonalds or a snack bar, this can be an engaging way to spend your summer months. Get ready for hours spent behind a hot fryer, and the possibility of dealing with rude customers. In the end, you’ll likely learn tips to help you transition into moving away from home.

Retail: Any job that involves selling merchandise falls under the category of retail. You can be hawking clothing, electronics, toys, or anything else. If you want to spend your summer out of the heat, this can be a great way to learn sales techniques or the specifics of a product. Just make sure to apply early; these are often jobs that are occupied year-round, so don’t expect to walk up and immediately get a gig at the mall.

Camp Counselor: If you like kids, this just might be the job for you. Expect to deal with a lot of shenanigans throughout June, July, and August, and you won’t be disappointed. That said, this can be a rewarding way to shape a young person’s future, and one that could stick with you long after you head back to school in September.

Whatever you do, remember that summer is a time for fun and relaxation. Don’t live to work; work to live. Once the day is over and you take off your uniform, enjoy your time out of school, and make sure to hang with friends and family.




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Should Girl Scouts Sell Online?

Category : Entrepreneurship

Kurt Soller asks in Newsweek, “by banning online sales, are the Girl Scouts failing our daughters?”  8-year-old Wild Freeborn became a Girl Scout earlier this year, and set out to sell 12,000 boxes of the organization’s cookies. As a smart and forward thinking kid she decided to use the internet to increase her sales.  With the help of her dad she posted a YouTube video, starring Freeborn in Girl Scout gear, touting her straightforward sales pitch. “Buy cookies! And they’re yummy!” and set up an online order system that was limited to customers within their local area (so Freeborn could personally deliver them). It worked, but she got in trouble because the organization has a longstanding prohibition of online sales.

I can understand the safety concerns, but the Girl Scouts (and every other youth group) have to be encouraging their kids to utilize the internet. What do you think? How important are internet skills to you?  Similarly, Anastasia points out on YPulse that Saving Journalism Should Begin In High Schools – is your high school teaching kids internet schools?


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Where Are Teens Shopping?

Category : My First Job

Michael Grynbaum wrote an article in todays Times that said, “Retail Sales Weakest in 5 Months.”

The article continued, “Wednesday’s retail sales report was the latest sign of weak spending habits in July. In privately tracked sales figures released last week, many name-brand department stores and clothing outlets reported significant declines in sales at stores that have been open at least a year.

Saks, Kohl’s, J.C. Penney and Target all reported sales declines, along with Gap and other popular apparel brands.

Americans seemed to be shifting their shopping habits to wholesale clubs and discount outlets, although even the big-box stores are seeing signs of a slowdown. Sales at Wal-Mart in July rose but failed to match expectations, a surprising show of weakness for the discount behemoth, which also said its business would worsen in August. Wal-Mart also said that shopping patterns indicated that more customers were living paycheck to paycheck.”

and also, “The weak labor market, which has played a big role in the cutback in consumer spending, has shown few signs of improvement. New claims for unemployment benefits rose last week to the highest level in six years, according to the Labor Department. New applications rose by a seasonally adjusted 7,000 to 455,000 for the week ended Aug. 2.”

And you know when its bad for everybody, its worse for teens.


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Myfirstpaycheck.com Crippling Newspapers?

Category : My First Job

Alan Mutter, a Media-technology consultant, wrote about MyFirstPaycheck | Jobs for Teens in his recent white paper about the newspaper industry. He used MyFirstPaycheck | Jobs for Teens as an example of how the help wanted market is developing to meet niches. This is not good for newspapers, but very good for us.

I’d like to point out that I’m a huge newspaper person, and am not celebrating the end of newspapers. Rather, I am highlighting this white paper (and our mention in it) to illustrate the little things that newspapers could be doing now to change their fortunes.

If there are any newspapermen who are interested in chatting about Alan’s paper, or teen viewers, shoot me an email.

I’m looking at you Brian Tierney.

Alan wrote, “MyFirstPaycheck.Com not only helps teens find their first jobs but also shows them how to write a resume and tells them what to expect in an interview. If you are retiring from the Navy, you can post your skills and career goals at NavyLeague.Org, where employers will seek you out. ” Alan writes, in an industry that Peter Zollman, the founder of the Classified Intelligence consulting group, conservatively estimated sold some $3.5 billion in recruitment ads in 2007 by the conservative estimate by such online entities as Monster, Hot Jobs, Dice, Ladders, 6FigureJobs, Craigs List (which charges a modest fee for help-wanted ads in the largest metro markets) and scores of tiny sites like GasWork.Com, which specializes in positions for anesthesiologists.

Alan adds that Gordon Borrell, who heads a research firm bearing his name, believes the total online expenditure for recruitment last year was a much larger $6.7 billion. His estimate includes not only money spent on sites ranging from Monster to Gas Work but also the funds that corporations spend on the recruitment environments they build on their own websites.

Alan D. Mutter is the former CEO of three Silicon Valley companies involved in online media technology and broadband media delivery; the former COO of a national cable television company with more than $200 million in annual sales, and a former editor who led the newsrooms of the Chicago Sun-Times and San Francisco Chronicle during periods of record-high circulation at both newspapers.

He has consulted on media, technology and mobile strategies for Texas Pacific Group, the Sun-Times Media Group, the Fox Television Network Affiliate Board, BASF and Kyocera. He devotes significant time to investing in and advising private companies delivering Media 3.0 content and advertising solutions. He has lectured at Northwestern and Arizona State Universities and publishes a widely quoted online commentary on the technological developments challenging the traditional media. His blog, “Reflections of a Newsosaur,” is at www.newsosaur.blogspot.com.


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Summer Job Shortage Squeezing Retailers

Category : Other Stuff

Bloomberg has a great story about the summer job shortage hurting retailers. Lauren Coleman-Lochner and Heather Burke write, “The financial pressures of adults are finally catching up with American teenagers. Since summer jobs dried up, gasoline prices topped $4 a gallon and parents ran out of spare cash, teens have had to cool it on spending for clothes..

Spending by 13- to 17-year-olds is important because in at least the past two years it has been rising faster than total apparel sales. The adolescent demographic accounted for $27 billion, or 14 percent, of the $192.7 billion of clothing purchases in the 12 months through April, according to market- research firm NPD Group Inc…. and Retailers dependent on that group are feeling the pinch.”

Not only is it important for businesses to hire teens to give them experience, but it also makes business sense. We work with many restaurants and retailers who are worried about losing teenage dollars – myfirstpaycheck.com is a great place to advertise for employees and customers.