Job Search

  • 0

Teen Jobs at Panera Bread

Category : Job Search

Panera Bread

Panera Bread is an American company that began in 1981 on the east coast. It has continued to expand as the company strives to become a well-known brand, having bakery-cafes in the U.S. and Canada. Panera Bread has been awarded many times, such as for excelling as a fast casual restaurant and being a leader in the hospitality industry. If you’d like to work for this award-winning company, keep reading!

Jobs at Panera

Listed below are job positions that may be available at your local Panera store. The first two positions – cashier and line cook – can be filled by 16 years olds. However, the rest – delivery driver, baker, shift supervisor, and head line cook can only be filled by people who are at least 18.

Cashier

Cashiers at Panera must be enthusiastic team players who can quickly deliver exactly what the customer wants. To be a cashier, you must be at least 16 years old and understand basic food safety. Also, previous experience in food service or retail is preferred.

Line Cook

Line cooks are responsible for preparing menu items quickly and correctly. You must be at least 16 years old and understand basic food safety to be a line cook. Previous experience in food service or retail is preferred.

Delivery Driver

Delivery drivers are responsible for delivering food right to the customer’s doorstep. When there are no deliveries, drivers also work inside the cafes. Drivers are also repaid for their gas usage. To be a delivery driver for Panera, you must be at least 18 years old and have a valid driver’s license, insurance, registration, and a reliable vehicle.

Baker

There are both day and night bakers at Panera Bread. Both positions require someone who can accurately create the baked goods that Panera sells. You must be at least 18 years old to be a baker. 1-2 years of experience as a baker is also preferred.

Shift Supervisor

Shift supervisors at Panera Bread must be strong team players who can inspire associates, while ensuring high productivity. You must be 18 years old to be a shift supervisor. Also, experience in food service and retail is preferred.

Production Zone Leader

Production Zone Leaders create energy and take the lead. It is their job to make sure all products are presented correctly. To be a Production Zone Leader, you must have had experience as a head line cook in a kitchen or production line, practice basic food safety, and be at least 18 years old.

Benefits and Pay

Salaries at Panera Bread vary depending on location and position. For example, drivers can earn around $12 to $15 per hour, not including tips! Both cashiers and line cooks have an average salary of $9 an hour. Lastly, both night and day bakers have average salaries around $11 – $12 an hour.

Benefits at Panera include:

  • Competitive pay
  • Health benefits including medical, dental, vision, life, and disability
  • 401(k) plan
  • Paid time off
  • Panera meal discount
  • Discount programs for merchandise and services

Additionally, there are some special benefits for delivery drivers, including:

  • Meal discount programs
  • Auto insurance discounts
  • Roadside Assistance
  • New and used auto discounts

You can search for current job opportunities at Panera Bread Careers. If you find a job that interests you, you must first register and make a user account. After that, you can continue to apply online. If a manager thinks you might be a good match, they will follow up with you!

To find more jobs that hire teens, check out this post.

Image Credit


  • 0

How To Find A Summer Job In High School

Category : Job Search

Now it’s time to get serious about making some money so you can get serious about having some fun this summer. Here’s my insider guide to finding a summer job that fits your style and skills.

Step 1 – What do you want?

The very first thing you need to do is figure out what you want to do. Do you want to be inside or outside? Do you want to be doing office work or physical work? Do you want lots of hours or just a few? Do you want to serve people as a server or cashier or do you want to do things like stock shelves and work load out at Home Depot?

Take a minute, print out this page, and fill in what you want and what you don’t want.

Things I want:

_______________________

_______________________

_______________________

Things I don’t want:

_______________________

_______________________

_______________________

One more thing:

What is your minimum pay level? Decide this first because if you don’t, you’ll settle for less than this. You are worth whatever you can negotiate for.

Step 2 – Make a resume

Okay, now that you know what you want and don’t want it is time to create a resume. This is one of the main ways you are going to present yourself to potential employers. It is not the only way… you’ll hear more about that later in step 4 and 5.

So, you need to create a resume. Open up Microsoft Word or Google Docs or anything you can use to create a resume, create a PDF, and print out some copies. This is super important. You need to represent yourself with a resume to people who don’t know you so take some time and get this right!

Go to Google and search for example teen resumes or sample resume templates. Find something you like and copy it. Here are the sections you need to have:

  • Name and Contact Information
  • Education
  • Classes and Projects
  • Strong Skills
  • Experience (volunteering, community service, or past jobs)

Don’t take too long on this step. Get a template figured out and filled in. If this takes you more than an hour for the first draft, you’re making it too big a deal.

Once you have a resume you need other people to proof read it!

Now, don’t be asking your friends who failed English class and cannot even spell text slang correctly. Get this in front of a teacher or a parent or a friend who aces papers.

Mistakes will cause your resume to be set aside without consideration, so get it right!

Step 3 – Job Search

Time to do some job searching. Spend an hour to do this first, before you get on the phone and start walking in to stores and businesses asking if they have openings. Do this first because you will learn what is available, what the expectations are, maybe what they pay. You will figure out what types of local businesses have entry level openings.

YOU CAN EVEN APPLY ONLINE FROM YOUR PHONE!

>>> Start your job search right here <<<

Step 4 – Get On The Phone

Alright, now that you’ve checked out the openings, you know what sorts of companies have positions for you, you know what you might be able to do. Now it is time to separate yourself form the people that don’t come to MyFirstPaycheck.

Get on the phone!

Call the local businesses you found with openings or other businesses just like them to find out if they have a position. If they do, ask how to apply. Then DO IT!

Call 5 to 10 businesses right now. The first one will be hard but the last will be easy.

Step 5 – Get On Your Feet

Now that you’ve spread your resume out at local companies it is time to walk in to some of them and ask if they have positions. If you haven’t gotten a job yet and you haven’t done this then you don’t really want a job. This will separate you from all the slackers who are too lazy to get a job and live the way they want to live over the summer!

Go to the local businesses, the ones around you, and ask if they have a need for someone with your skills over the summer. This will bring out some of the best jobs in the community.

Now, you need to:

  1. Dress appropriately
  2. Take a resume to leave with each business
  3. Be friendly
  4. Be confident

I walked out of Eagle hardware back in the day with a job after walking in and asking if they needed help. This is exactly what it took for me to find something. You can do it to.

Land Your Job

Go through the process and what you will find is that job will appear in front of you. It might take some time. You might have to do some things you haven’t done before. You might need to show some confidence. You might need to step out of your comfort zone. Those that are willing to go get what you want will be rewarded.


  • 0

Student Jobs

There are different reasons why young people look for student jobs. This is usually the case when the allowances or student loans become rather inadequate to cover all those expenses you feel you need to make as a student. Here is a guide on the types of employment you can consider either as a student or a graduate.

Part-time jobs

This is a work-study type of employment. As a matter of fact, part-time jobs are the kind people usually have in focus when talking about student jobs. These jobs allow you have time for your study while at the same time making some money on the side. But you need to endeavor not to lose focus on the main reason you are in school, so you need to cap the number of hours you work a week at a level that will not impact negatively on your study. The number of hours to spare for work per week will fluctuate from time to time as determined by your academic workload.

Here are a couple of the most popular part-time jobs you may consider:

Sitting jobs – People sometimes require the services of a person to help take care of their kids or pets while they are away. A mother could need your help in taking care of her child while she is on a night out. Homeowners may also need someone to look after their pet and/or house while going on a journey. You could make a decent amount, with possible tips, by doing this sort of jobs.

Retail jobs – The retail sector also makes for a great place to look for student jobs. By working as a sales assistant at a retail outlet, your duties will include attending to customers, receiving payments and restocking shelves or freezers. Retail jobs offer flexible working hours, making them great for students. You may also get to enjoy discounts on your own purchases as an employee.

Full-time jobs

These are jobs that require you to work for long hours each day, just like an average employee. Since this type of employment involves you working a full work day every day, it may not be totally correct to describe it as student jobs. The jobs are better suited to graduates who have completed their education.

Internships

Internship refers to a work arrangement by employers that lets students work with them for a short period of time. It could be offered on either a full-time or part-time basis. You may call full-time internships the full-time option of student jobs. This is because they are usually offered during holiday periods and allow you work for long hours each day. Internships enable you gain useful work experience. They could be paid, unpaid or partially-paid openings.

Finding student jobs

You can find different kinds of student jobs on myfirstpaycheck.com/jobs/. You only need to enter the kind of jobs you want in the “What” field and your preferred location in the “Where” field. To further fine tune your search, you can click on Advanced Job Search to specify the name of your preferred company, salary date and time since job posting, among others.

The information provided here should be useful in helping you find desired student jobs that could enable you make extra money and gain useful work experience.


  • -

Job Openings For Teens

Category : Internships , Job Search

There are diverse reasons why teens should consider working. One of these is to enable them get extra money to spend on items or activities that their allowances might not cover. There is also the advantage of gaining useful work experience. This post provides guidance on how you can find job openings for teens.

“Read More”

  • -

Teen Jobs Hiring Near Me

Category : Job Search

The benefits of teen jobs go beyond just the extra money they bring in for young people. They provide good opportunity for meeting people that could impact positively on an individual’s life and to learn new, essential life skills. But as a young person, it is always best to work close to home for diverse reasons, including security. Some young people know this, which is why they search for “teen jobs hiring near me.”Here are some tips you can use to find such jobs.

“Read More”

  • -

Create a Killer LinkedIn Profile Resume

Category : Job Search

Employers are increasingly factoring social media activity or presence into the equation of recruiting candidates for different positions in their organizations. LinkedIn is somewhat the favorite among recruiters. It is said that 3 in 4 Fortune 100 companies use the platform when looking to make new hires. With several millions of people on the social network, you need to find a way to make your profile speak for you to stand a chance of getting the job of your dreams. Here are some tips you can use for creating a killer LinkedIn profile resume.

“Read More”

  • -

Jobs in New York

Category : Job Search

Are you a college graduate and interested in entry-level jobs in New York? If yes, you would be pleased to learn that there are diverse opportunities and openings available for college graduates. Information technology, marketing, finance and health are few of the industries with the highest number of these opportunities. Here are some of the best entry-level jobs for college graduates.

“Read More”

  • 0

Heathrow Airport Jobs

Category : Job Search

The London Heathrow Airport is a leading airport not only in the United Kingdom, but also in Europe and the world. It is a great place that anyone can dream to work based on remuneration and other benefits, including international exposure. In this post, you will learn all you need to know about this aviation facility and available Heathrow Airport jobs.

“Read More”

  • -

Companies That Hire High School Students

Category : Job Search

The process of finding a job as a high school student can be cumbersome at times. Those groups of students below the age of 18 are faced with restrictions on the kind of jobs that they can take up and the number of hours they can work. As one of such students, it then becomes helpful for you to know what companies hire high school students. The information you require is here!

“Read More”

  • 0

Flagstaff AZ Jobs

Category : Job Search

Supposedly named after a ponderosa pine flagpole, Flagstaff is an Arizonan city that has a lot to offer in different areas of life. Starting out from an economy reliant on ranching, lumbering and the railroad, the city has today transformed into a major distribution center and an important tourist center as well as a hub for research and development industries. This post aims at providing information that will be relevant to someone searching for Flagstaff AZ jobs.

“Read More”

  • -

Part Time Jobs For Students

Category : Job Search , Jobs For

Part-time jobs for students, both those in high schools and colleges, offer a good means of getting extra money to take care of bills while in school. Such jobs also help to enhance the chances of high school students gaining admission into their preferred colleges and universities. Are you interested in part-time jobs for students, either for yourself or your children? Here are some great jobs that you can check out.

“Read More”

  • -

How to Find a Seasonal Winter Job

Category : Job Search

With Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays around the corner, we are into that period when many people are interested in how to find a seasonal winter job. Seasonal jobs, by definition, are jobs that last for a short period of time. They constitute good means for companies to temporarily add to their staff strength during peak seasons. While a seasonal job may appear unattractive by their description, it could actually be helpful in helping you land a permanent position, and the period from Thanksgiving to Christmas is replete with such jobs. If you are interested in having one, here is how to find a seasonal winter job.

“Read More”

  • -

How to Dress for a Job Interview

Category : Job Search

Overview

When interviewing for a job, it is always important to dress your best. The first thing an interviewer will notice will be how you look and what you’re wearing. You want to give a great first impression. In today’s competitive job market, this has become especially important. From a survey done by ClassesandCareers.com on 2000 bosses, 65% said clothes could be the deciding factor between two similar candidates. You need to show that it is you who deserves to be there.

“Read More”

  • -

Teen Jobs Resource Center

Category : Job Search , Other Stuff

Welcome to the Resource Center for Teen Jobs

A good first job is hard to find. Many times kids will get lucky and have a connection, whether it is their parents or their friends’ parents, who help them to have their first job. However, even if you don’t have a connection to a job (or simply choose not to use it) you can still find one that is interesting and well paid if you know where to look. By considering your interests and what could be a stimulating position you can start narrowing your focus and then modify your search accordingly. Your first job may not be your dream job, but you can find a good one if you are motivated to do so.

“Read More”

  • -

Advice Survey Results

Advice Survey Results

Welcome to the survey section of myfirstpaycheck.com where you can find advice from experienced members of the workforce or contribute your own.


Justin Guerra’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Selling newspapers

How did you find that first job?
Through an ad in the newspaper

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Location, distance from home, and hours of work.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
Be polite. Be respectful. Dress nice.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It helped me gain experience and learn what is expected in a workplace

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Have a positive attitude. You might not get hired with the first 5 or even 10 applications, but stay in there. Good things happen to those who wait.


Julie Lynn Hohnecker’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Lawn Mowing

How did you find that first job?
Neighbors and my parents.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Networking with other teenagers and family friends.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
To be honest and don’t be afraid to ask questions.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It helped me to be a better person by knowing that I am doing and helping someone else because they are too old to do it themselves.


J. Pelley’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Bailing and stacking hay

How did you find that first job?
My neighbor asked me to help him when I was done bailing my own hay.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Distance, hours, income

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
Make a good first impression. Dress well, not grungy.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
Discipline and endurance.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Don’t try to go for a job you’ve got no chance of getting.


Anonymous’ Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Babysitting

How did you find that first job?
I set out on my street and told all of my neighbors that I was starting a babysitting service and everything took off from there

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Ask yourself, do you enjoy doing this job? Do you make enough money? Is it worth it?

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
The first impression means everything, don’t be late.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
This job has helped me become more responsible.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Think outside the box


Austin’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Yard Work

How did you find that first job?
My older brother worked for a man that my dad works with and still does, my brother worked for him for many years and decided to quit because he found a real job and he asked if I would take his place and after thinking about it, I did.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
You should be careful on the type of job like if you want to make smoothies for a job than you should make sure that they have a good business report and would be in the right level for you to be working in.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
Make sure that you are going to be able to answer the questions given without thinking about them for a while, and speak clearly so they know who there hiring.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
I found that as I got older you are able to interact with that person easier and are able to get the job done and right to make that person happier, and the more work that you do may be hard but after words it would have really been worth it. As you get older you’ll be able to find better ways to spend and more importantly save the money you have made.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
I would definitely try to find a job some where close to home and as you work try to interact with the person you are working with and be positive!


Clorissa’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Babysitting

How did you find that first job?
My mom helped me find jobs.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Don’t give out your information without permission, and if your only a teen, bring an adult with you. Another important thing to remember is body language.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
You should know a lot about the job before you go into it because it might be something you are not capable of.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It taught me some responsibility.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Use good body language and stay in school for any job/career you want. Trust me, school gets you really far in life.


SJ’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Mowing Grass

How did you find that first job?
Through family and friends

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Make eye contact, stand straight, and smile.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
Speak fluently and don’t yell.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It taught me patience.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Do not whine when you don’t get the job you want.


Alisha’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
I worked on an animal farm

How did you find that first job?
I heard about the job from a friend.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Make sure the work is something you are familiar with.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
Make eye contact.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
This job helped make me more responsible in a lot of ways

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Look for a job that your kind of familiar with


Haley’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Babysitter

How did you find that first job?
My aunt was looking for someone to babysit my four cousins so I decided to help.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Make sure you know what the pay and hours are for the job.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
Having a job prepares me for life

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Do your best


George S.’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Intern at engineering firm

How did you find that first job?
Pure luck! My mother was working at a bookstore, and the director of this firm purchased the exact stack of books that I had purchased the previous week. My mother commented on the coincidence, the man offered his business card, and the following week, I had an interview.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Have an open mind!

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Remember the motto of the British Special Air Services: PROPER PLANNING PREVENTS PISS POOR PERFORMANCE. Plan ahead, get there early, and know what you’re walking into.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Even though I will never pursue engineering, the skills I learned at the firm have taught me to think visually, spatially, and mathematically.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
HAVE CONFIDENCE! DO NOT BE AFRAID TO ASK QUESTIONS! THERE ARE NO “STUPID QUESTIONS”


Karyn’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Waitress

How did you find that first job?
I spoke to people at a locally owned little restaurant

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Location (since being on time is really important, and as a teenager I didn’t have my own car when I got my first job) Location (since being on time is really important, and as a teenager I didn’t have my own car when I got my first job) Impressions are really important, dress appropriately, and if you are going to inquire about a job, timing is important…so at a restaurant don’t ask to talk to a manager about a job during a really busy Friday night. When filling out an application make sure you write very carefully (best hand writing and no mistakes).

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Have some knowledge about the company you want to work at, be ready for them to ask you popular questions (like identify a weakness) and be prepared to frame your answers in a way that puts a good spin on it. Also it’s a good idea to think about what question(s) you might want to ask them, because many employers will ask you if you have questions. Punctuality is essential – don’t be late…especially for an interview or your first day. Don’t be afraid to ask questions if you don’t understand something.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Learning how to work with people, and in a restaurant serving people, gave me an understanding for the food business that I still find useful today. When the money you make is directly affected by the work of other people (tips aren’t so good when things are going wrong) you learn to pitch in and help wherever you can. I also think it helped me to multitask and have a good memory, I would suggest that everyone works in the food service industry at some point, it’s a good experience.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Do your homework, look around, and be prepared for it not to be what you expect. People have an average of 7 job changes in their lives, so your first job is most likely not going to be your last. Try to stick it out, and remember that your experiences (good or bad) will follow you when you leave.


Katherine’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Toy Store Clerk

How did you find that first job?
I called the toy store.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Don’t dress messy.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
No, i was fired after 2 weeks

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Don’t dress messy. Be on time.


Sam Blum’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Cold Stone Creamery

How did you find that first job?
I went out and filled out a bunch of applications. Cold Stone called me first, so I took it.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Keep an open mind.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Don’t be nervous. If you’ve gotten the interview, or it’s your first day, your employer thinks you can take on the job. Stay confident, be friendly, and most importantly, be yourself.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
My co-workers have become my great friends. It was my first “adult” experience, as I was able to take on new challenges, try new things, and have a great time making money.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Apply everywhere you can, you can always turn someone down. I got my job before my first paycheck, but if I was first looking now, Myfirstpaycheck.com would be a really great place to start.


Nita’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
baby sitting

How did you find that first job?
asked by a friend

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
find people you can trust and display good work ethic themselves

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
relax, dress nice but comfortably, smile, lean forward, shake hands, be pleasant

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
I love kids and liked finding work involving children… I got a good recommendation too.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Find work that you like so you look forward to going to work.


Lois’ Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
I worked at Pretzel Time in the mall

How did you find that first job?
My friends and I were mall rats. Most of us had jobs at various stores in the mall so we knew the managers and other employees.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
What kind of person do you want to work for? What kind of people do you want to work with?

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Know where you need to go and how to get there, know the dress code, ask questions when you don’t know something.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
The networking I did from that job helped me get jobs for the next four years (even in another city when I went away to college). I still use the networking skills I gained at that job.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Be okay starting at the bottom and working your way up…almost everyone has to do it. Have fun with your job and have fun with the people you work with.


Alberto’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Bagger/Cashier- Acme Supermarket

How did you find that first job?
I decided to get a job last summer, and I applied to Acme online. They called me back several weeks later.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Employers love to here from you. If you apply, wait a week, and then call them back “regarding your application”, it let’s them know that you are confident and assertive. Don’t, however, take this to the extreme and call the day after you apply.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Interview etiquette is pretty straight forward. Be polite, but make sure they know they can’t take advantage of you. Make sure you fully understand the job guidelines as well as the salary you are going to receive.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
If you’re looking for a summer job: -apply early and to many different places, because EVERYBODY is applying at the same time. I recommend starting in March or April. I waited, and I missed about a month of the summer going through the process instead of making money. -Pretty much nobody except beaches and pools wants a worker who will only stay for the summer. They won’t hire you unless you commit for at least through the fall.


Doug’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Fuel Transfer Technician (gas pumper)

How did you find that first job?
I looked on www.myfirstpaycheck.com. Just kidding! That website was just a glimmer in the eye of a bunch of Lavins at that time. The truth is that a kid on my basketball team was quitting and so I took his spot when he left.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Make sure that the job will help you achieve some definite goals, whether they be developing new skills, gaining experience, making money, or whatever. Try to get a job where you are surrounded by a good team of people that will help you and encourage you.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Bring phone numbers for your references. I always forget that one!

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
Being a gas pumper at Sunoco? Hmmm. It’s made me want to ride a bicycle everywhere I go. That’s good, right?

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Go for the gusto. Be bold. Be Sincere.


Max’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Waiter

How did you find that first job?
I was walking around and saw a help wanted sign

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
To be open and not to critical

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Be polite, neat, respectful, and try to not to be nervous and freak out

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
My first job I had a boss who was a an incredibly unhappy person who was always riding me and my fellow employees, working there helped me learn to deal with that kind of situation.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Don’t be to critical, never feel trapped, never work for an establishment that treats you terribly dont be afraind to stick up for yourself


AL in DC’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Receptionist

How did you find that first job?
The easy way, I got a job at my father’s office when I was 16 year old.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
It is important to come to an interview ready to ask questions. Now that I am in a position to hire people, much of my evaluation of candidates’ question about the company and the job.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Before you start ask questions about dress code. Don’t make the mistake of dressing at the lower end of the dress code. Your dress tells your colleagues a great deal about how seriously you take yourself and your job.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
I was lucky that in my first few jobs I worked for people who felt it was their responsibility to teach me good skills and habits. My first boss told me that I should begin to straighten my desk when the clock struck 5 o’clock and not a moment before. I should actively work and not appear to be waiting to race from the office.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Keeping knocking on doors. Job hunting is depressing and discouraging until the day you get the job. You forget the tough times immediately.


Susan Kilborn’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Assistant in the local public library

How did you find that first job?
I was in the library alot and asked if they needed summer help.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Try to think what you like to do most and try to get a job doing that or around other people who are doing it in a support capacity. Persistence is almost always a winner. Keep checking back, dropping by and emailing the place where you really WANT to work. Once you get a job there, ask for help. Ask for feedback. Ask for more responsibility if you see an opportunity for it. Work and SMILE.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
I jumped the gun and answered this one up above.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
I still love libraries.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Ask questions. Try to learn something about the place where you work before you get there. such as asking for the roster of personnelle so you can start learning the names of the people who work there. Volunteer for work if you don’t have anything to do. Don’t just sit there!


Emily’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Tennis instructor

How did you find that first job?
through my tennis coach

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
make sure you do something you love

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
dress professionally, arrive early

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It taught me discipline

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Do your research!


Steve in Seattle’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Window Washer

How did you find that first job?
I teamed up with a buddy and we brought squeegee’s and soap and a bucket to an outdoor strip mall and told each store that we were real experienced, and finally an art store hired us on a regular basis. I think we got a couple more stores, and after a couple weeks we actually got pretty good at window washing.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
If you depend on walking or bicycling, or the bus or mom & dad to drive you, consider the convenience of the place you are selecting. Pay attention to the workers already there who you might have to work with. You might ask them, without letting the boss hear you, how long they have worked there, and do they like it. If you sense that three or four people have recently left, and that everyone there is somewhat new, then the “turn over” is high, and the boss might be a grouch, or expect more work out of you than what the job desciption says.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Well, I am no longer a teen. But I was a teen once. I would suggest making a great first impression on the one in charge of hiring you. Give them eye contact and a firm handshake, and try not to look down like you are shy or frightened, even if you are. If they ask your name, say it clearly as though you are proud of your name. And yes, dress a bit fancier than what will be expected if hired. You can always roll up your sleeves when they get comfortable with you, but if you start out dressed too casual, it is hard to become more formal at that point. The hardest part of an interview in your situation might be if your future boss decides to engage you in small talk, such as, “How about those Eagles?” or…”What music do you listen to?” It can get tricky, but just be aware in advance that you might have to say something about sports or music or a certain movie or TV show. I would advise you to pretend to first take interest in what team or TV show your future boss likes, then agree with their taste, or say, “My parents like the same thing you do.” It is less about what you answer, than how. Grown-ups just want to feel like their teen employees will be able to carry on an intelligent conversation, and not steal from them. If the interviewer says anything that seems the slightest bit inappropiate or too personal, remember not everything is their business, and it would be best to politely excuse yourself and look for work elsewhere.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?Regardless of your age, the bottom line is you are costing your boss money if you get hired. They have something you want, or need, and it pays to smile and be respectful to them.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
If you are handed a job application, offer three or more “character” references, as you will not yet have any job references. The best character references come from local business owners, politicians, priests, rabbis, and ministers, who are well established. Perhaps you are regular customers at a local grocery store, car repair place, or nursery, and have gone in with your mother or father, or friend. Or a dentist, or alderman is your neighbor, and you go to school with their kids. You can ask them permission to put their name and business/occupation and number down on your job application. It really “beefs it up,” and, again, gives the impression you are honest, not spacy, and won’t take drugs…the stuff older folks who own businesses have concerns about when they think “teen.”


Ari S’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Working at the Narberth Cheese Company as a sales associate.

How did you find that first job?
All I did was walk around town and look for “Help Wanted” signs. When you see them, I went into the store and asked for an application.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?

  1. Location: It has to be easy and cheap for you to get to.
  2. Your Commitment: You have to know how much time you are able to work and be honest about it.
  3. Your Capability: Can you see yourself working at the place you are applying? Meaning is it over your head or not, and are you able to stand doing it You don’t have to like it, but that would be a plus. Also, when you go to ask for an application it would be great if you did not look like a slob. First impressions are key.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Once again, don’t look like a slob when you go to the interview. If you feel like it, dress up a little…it never hurts. And for the first day (and maybe even first month) don’t get hung up on little things that you mess up. You’re new, you’ll be corrected, and then you move on.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?The Cheese Company has been a great experience for me. In fact, I’m still there (I’ve only been there for a year though). I do everything from sales, to inventory, to janitor…ing. I have met a lot of people and learned about many things, not all of which are about cheese.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?

  1. If you are applying for the summer, don’t wait until the end of school.
  2. Most places will require working papers, so get those from your school’s main office or guidance office.
  3. Be practical about where you are going to work
  4. Not to sound too lame, but try to have a little fun with it…if that’s at all possible.

Mark’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
I taught swimming to kids at the local YMCA.

How did you find that first job?
The assistant coach to my high school swim team worked there.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?

  1. Find a job that you can get to without relying on someone else.
  2. It’s your first job, not a career. So, although it’s always best to do something interesting, don’t sweat it if it’s not.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?

Interview:

  1. Be serious, but also yourself at the interview. They’re usually more interested in whether you’ll fit in than whether you know how to do the job, especially when we’re talking first job-type stuff like cashier, line cook, etc.
  2. Dress to impress. You should be dressed about one notch fancier than what you would actually wear to the job.

First day:

  1. Show up early. It shows you’re responsible and gives you time to get the lay of the land.
  2. Dress to impress. Just like #2 above. It shows you’re serious. You can dress down on your second or third day.

Employment:

Remember, the reason it’s called work and it’s something you’re paid to do is because it’s not always fun. Even rock stars hate their jobs some days.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?

Teaching is actually something I’ve done on and off ever since my first job. So I guess that I lucked out and found something that I really enjoy doing.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?

Pound the pavement and don’t be disappointed if you get turned down the first few times.


Ari’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Working at Thrift Drug as a cashier
How did you find that first job?
I walked around looking for summer jobs until I found it.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
As a teen? Get as much money as you can because anything you do will be fairly dull.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Make sure you are clean and well dressed, always be enthusiastic about everything

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
Back then I learned how to deal with customers and today, I still deal with them, only now, I call them clients.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
At this young age, follow the money.


Ronn’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
McDonald’s Cashier

How did you find that first job?
I walked in and asked them if they hired 14-year-olds (Nowhere else did)

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Are you going to be able to be cheerful at the job? How badly do you need the money? Could you get something better? Remember, this isn’t a career.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Try to seem independent, despite being dependent on your parents. Just act intelligent. A place like McDonalds doesn’t care about your skills or anything.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
I know I never want to work as a cashier. I value money in terms of hours of McDonalds work now.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Your best bet as someone with no experience is to get a job through a relative.


Josh’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Soccer Referee

How did you find that first job?
A friend of mine was doing it, and I asked him how I could get involved

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
You’ve got to be realistic about logistics, including how many hours you can work (and want to work). It’s nice to make money, but you if you spend all of your time in school and then at work, you’re going to miss out on a lot of enjoyment. Remember, the older you get, the more you end up working and you have less time for yourself.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Take everything seriously. Employers look for maturity and a sense of responsibility.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
As a referee you take a lot of criticism, no matter how good you are. It was important for me to learn how to take criticism (even though it may not be constructive). I also learned to stay confident in the face of criticism.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Find something you like to do or are interested in and see if there is any way to get paid while being involved in it. For me, I loved playing soccer, so I looked for ways to get paid while being around the game. If you get into the habit of working for money, you will always just be working for money. But if you get into the habit of getting paid for doing what you like to do, you will end up much happier.


Austin’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Mowing Lawns and Shoveling Snow

How did you find that first job?
Went to neighbors who I knew, talked to my parents friends, friend’s parents, anywhere where I could walk

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?

It’s important to find something that you enjoy because it’ll make working easier. I liked being outside and having control of my own hours so landscaping was never hard.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?

Show them that you want the job, and be capable of your own abilities. Most kids have worked in some capacity; babysitting, petsitting, yardwork, etc. remember that you are capable of handling the responsibility, and than make sure you do a good job.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It helped me get the next job and the job after. I was able to take on a big landscaping project for a neighbor and a friend that involved multiple days and hiring my brothers, but I knew I could do the job, and I could it cheaper than a professional landscaper. I was also able to use that experience to obtain my first salaried position, at a plant nursery.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Be persistent. If you aren’t getting rejected, you’re not trying hard enough.


Nick’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Receptionist at a Law Firm

How did you find that first job?
A friend of the family worked there

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
It’s important to remember how the expenses of getting to the job, etc, are going to effect the amount of $ you take home – for example, one place may pay more than another, but it’s so far away that the expenses of the commute kind of even the salaries out.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
If you act like you don’t want to be there, you’re not going to be there for long.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It’s helped me realize that I never want another job that requires me to answer phones with the same line, all day long.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
You’re probably not going to get a job that you actually like – welcome to the world of work.


Bracha’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Working at the Mall of America for Gapkids (and spending all of the money I made at gap–great discount!)

How did you earn that first job?
I knew a friend that had started there so i was able to get an interview

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
It’s important to know how you’ll get there and back every shift, if you will be able to work the number of hours you want, if you will be able to make “enough” money, how the boss is, how the staff is, the perks, etc.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
It’s important to present yourself well, which usually means dressing up a little bit, not chewing gum, cell phone off. It’s important to maintain open communication so if you have a question about the first day, or any day, that you ask your supervisor. Better to ask than to try to figure it out yourself

How has that job helped you as you grew older?
It helped me get my second job, which helped me get my third job, etc. also, I think that at some point everyone should work in the service industry (retail, restaurants, theme parks) because even though people can get rude, if you can handle the crowd you can handle any assignment further down the line.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for their first job?
Use any connections from friends or family members that you might have (or websites that cater to first time employees!), don’t get discouraged if not everyone is hiring, or they do not hire you. Find the places that are hiring, drop off applications, ask when you should expect a call, and follow up by that time by calling to talk to the manager.



Image: Flickr


  • -

Advice

Looking for Resume Guide and Tips? Click Here!

We’re here to help teenagers find jobs. It’s tough to earn that first paycheck, but we’re here to make it easier.

Learning how to apply for jobs isn’t something we always learn in school, but it’s an important skill. It’s especially important as a teen applying for your first job to make a good first impression, and Myfirstpaycheck.com can help.

Check out our five quick job searching tips below:

1. Be Brave. Even in this economy, there are plenty of employers out there looking for the affordable, enthusiastic, and energetic help that teenagers provide, but you have to go out and ask for it.  Don’t be afraid to apply for jobs.

2.  Be Polite. You are applying for a job; dress up, make eye contact, shake hands, and avoid using slang. First impressions matter – make sure you are remembered for your application and not your attitude.

3. Be Prepared. Bring a resume and a cover letter whenever you apply for a job. Having a good resume is essential. It shows that you are serious about the position, and that you are mature and responsible. If you need help writing a resume, myfirstpaycheck.com provides a dynamic free resume for teens
that is very helpful.

4. Be Persistent. It would be nice if you were immediately offered every job that you ever applied for, unfortunately this is not the case for anybody. Persistence pays off; send a thank you note to interviewers, follow-up if you do not hear about the job after a week, and keep applying.

5. Be Creative. Look for work in places other than the mall. The weakening economy means that people are going to be looking to cut costs in areas such as lawn and child care. Get a few friends together and start a landscaping or a babysitting business. Working for yourself is a great way to earn money and develop skills that will help you find your next job.

We have surveyed our friends and colleagues to find out how that got that first job and what advice they have for today’s teens. Read what they had to say.



Image: Flickr


  • 0

Where to Find Jobs Locally

Category : Job Search

As a teenager, searching for a job can be difficult. Most job searches will provide results for degree holders, but not for teenagers who are looking to earn some extra cash from an after school or a summer job. Fortunately, there are a few places that you can look to find a good job around your town.

  1. Bulletin Boards: Bulletin boards can be found in a variety of places around town and are ideal for finding information on various things, including job possibilities. You will most likely see bulletin boards in grocery stores, post offices, cafes, and news shops, which means the postings will be very local. People will use these to post things for sale, services offered, classes, lost or missing things or animals, and jobs. A job post should provide a brief description of the job type, responsibilities, and location. There should definitely be contact information so that you can inquire and even apply for the position. Some postings will have tear offs at the bottom of the page with the contact information so you can take it with you.
  2. Community Centers: Community Centers are a great resource for your job search. There are usually a lot of job opportunities there because they have connections with a variety of groups and organizations throughout town. If you like active, hands on, and creative jobs, this is a good place to work as community centers run a lot of sports and games activities, day camps, and various classes such as art.
  3. Newspapers: Although the internet is taking over most things in our life, the newspaper is still used. In the classifieds section of your newspaper you will find job postings for opportunities in your area. You will be provided with contact information so that you can inquire with the employer.
  4. Word of mouth: One of the best ways to find a job is by networking. Let people know you are looking for a local job, whether you prefer babysitting, waiting tables, or an office job. The more people you talk to, the higher the chances are that someone will know of a job opportunity for you. Networking is also beneficial because through your connections you may be able to meet with the employer directly, rather than with their secretary or another employee.

 



With all of these options, you will have a variety of jobs to apply to in order to earn some extra money during the school year or during your summer vacation!


  • 0

Part Time Jobs For Teens

Category : Job Search

Greeting Everyone to the Resource Center of Jobs For Teens

If you are in high school chances are that you wish you had some extra cash.  And when you are in high school, a little extra cash can go along way.  So, if you think that you have time in your busy schedule to start a part time job, its best to start looking now.

“Read More”

  • 0

Can You Land a Retail Job in a Recession?

Category : Job Search

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS just published an article, “Your Career: Landing a Retail Job in a Recession” that states, “Whenever a retailer does hire employers, it’s usually inundated by people hoping for a job.”

“J.C. Penney Co. received 15,000 applications, more than double what it expected, for 500 positions at its new Manhattan store. SnagAJob.com, an online site, said 160,596 applicants applied for jobs at one national department store chain in July, more than twice the number of a year ago.”

Yikes!

These applications aren’t coming from teenagers either. More and more adults are ‘settling’ for retail positions since they can’t find anything else.

What’s a teen to do?


  • 0

Work at Home Job Resources for High School & College Students

Category : College , Job Search

The New York Times just published a story about teenage entrepreneurs that featured Laura Durst, 18, a recent high school graduate in Woodstock, Conn., who created WorkInMyRoom.com to provide teenagers with information and online resources to find jobs that can be done from home.

It’s an example of what some teens are doing when they can’t find traditional jobs. You are not alone, if you are thinking of starting your own business. Interest in entrepreneurship education among teenagers is rising according to The Times.

Have you started your own business? Let us know and we’ll feature you on our blog.