My First Job

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Jobs Now Hiring for Fifteen Year Olds

You can enter the workforce at fifteen if you have enough initiative and drive. This post is all about how to find jobs for fifteen year olds. While many jobs that are targeted towards your age group are available during the summer, there are also year-round jobs that work around your school schedule.

Restaurants

There are several fast food restaurants that hire fifteen year olds. For example, you have the ability to work at McDonald’s as a crew member in the kitchen, at the counter, or in maintenance. Once you turn sixteen, you also get the opportunity to work as a cashier.

You can also work at Culver’s as a crew member. Culver’s restaurants are located in many states across the United States – you can check out all of their locations here.

Furthermore, the minimum age requirements of several fast food restaurants vary from location to location because they are franchises. Some of these restaurants include Burger King, Subway, and Wendy’s. Check with your local restaurant to find out what their age requirement is and if you can work there. Additionally, Starbucks may also hire fifteen year olds depending on the state it is located in.

If you live in Georgia, you also have the opportunity to work at Willy’s Mexicana Grill. As a team member, you would have the ability to have different responsibilities.

Recreational Parks

However, if you would rather spend your time working outside, you’re in luck. There are many amusement parks and recreational areas across the U.S. that hire fifteen year olds. For example, Canobie Lake Parks is an amusement park in New Hampshire that falls under this category. Although most positions require you to be at least sixteen years old, you can be hired through Sodexo (Canobie’s food provider) at fifteen.

Additionally, the Incline Village Recreation Center in Nevada also hires people under sixteen. The fitness and recreation center at Lake Tahoe hires employees year-round and seasonally. You can apply to be a dishwasher with no prior experience.

Another amusement park you have the opportunity to work at is Dorney Park & Wildwater Kingdom in Pennsylvania. Some examples of the jobs you can apply for are ticket taker, food & beverage associate, live entertainment, park services attendant, and aquatics crew member.

Lifeguards

Anyone can learn to be a lifeguard – you just have to be at least fifteen years old. The first step to becoming a lifeguard is attending a lifeguard training course, where you learn how to respond to emergencies that might occur in the water. Once you pass the course, you will receive an American Red Cross certificate for life-guarding.

Being a lifeguard is a great summer job because you won’t have to stay inside all day, and you’ll be able to add great experience to your resume. It isn’t just a summer job, though – camps, community pools, and amusement parks hire lifeguards throughout the year.

Independent Jobs

There are also a number of jobs that you can do on your own, such as:

  • Babysitter
  • Pet sitter
  • House sitter
  • Yard work
  • Tutor
  • Graphic designer
  • Odd jobs/errands
  • Car wash
  • Housework
  • Handing out flyers
  • Photographer

 

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Student Jobs

There are different reasons why young people look for student jobs. This is usually the case when the allowances or student loans become rather inadequate to cover all those expenses you feel you need to make as a student. Here is a guide on the types of employment you can consider either as a student or a graduate.

Part-time jobs

This is a work-study type of employment. As a matter of fact, part-time jobs are the kind people usually have in focus when talking about student jobs. These jobs allow you have time for your study while at the same time making some money on the side. But you need to endeavor not to lose focus on the main reason you are in school, so you need to cap the number of hours you work a week at a level that will not impact negatively on your study. The number of hours to spare for work per week will fluctuate from time to time as determined by your academic workload.

Here are a couple of the most popular part-time jobs you may consider:

Sitting jobs – People sometimes require the services of a person to help take care of their kids or pets while they are away. A mother could need your help in taking care of her child while she is on a night out. Homeowners may also need someone to look after their pet and/or house while going on a journey. You could make a decent amount, with possible tips, by doing this sort of jobs.

Retail jobs – The retail sector also makes for a great place to look for student jobs. By working as a sales assistant at a retail outlet, your duties will include attending to customers, receiving payments and restocking shelves or freezers. Retail jobs offer flexible working hours, making them great for students. You may also get to enjoy discounts on your own purchases as an employee.

Full-time jobs

These are jobs that require you to work for long hours each day, just like an average employee. Since this type of employment involves you working a full work day every day, it may not be totally correct to describe it as student jobs. The jobs are better suited to graduates who have completed their education.

Internships

Internship refers to a work arrangement by employers that lets students work with them for a short period of time. It could be offered on either a full-time or part-time basis. You may call full-time internships the full-time option of student jobs. This is because they are usually offered during holiday periods and allow you work for long hours each day. Internships enable you gain useful work experience. They could be paid, unpaid or partially-paid openings.

Finding student jobs

You can find different kinds of student jobs on myfirstpaycheck.com/jobs/. You only need to enter the kind of jobs you want in the “What” field and your preferred location in the “Where” field. To further fine tune your search, you can click on Advanced Job Search to specify the name of your preferred company, salary date and time since job posting, among others.

The information provided here should be useful in helping you find desired student jobs that could enable you make extra money and gain useful work experience.


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8 Benefits of Doing a Summer Internship Abroad

Category : Internships , My First Job

The benefits of taking on a summer internship or an overseas internship program are extensive. Not only will you gain the experience you need to carry out a full-time position, but your confidence will improve, you’ll build up your connections, and you may even land yourself a job if you really impress. However, simply showing your face every day is not enough. You need to ensure you make the most of your internship if you are to truly experience the benefits. Here are my top eight tips to help you do so:

Working in the park

  1. Record your experience throughout – You should take the time to record your experience while interning. You could keep a diary or write regular blog posts – the choice is yours. This is important for self-reflection and progression, yet it can also serve as a portfolio for potential future employers. But, remember to be careful with what you include so that you don’t breach any confidentiality agreements.
  2. Read the literature – Through my experience, there are many people that take on summer internship programs yet never read any related literature. They don’t pick up a book or read any blogs or articles to do with the industry. If you want to progress, you need to immerse yourself in the field you are interested in completely.
  3. Choose 1-2 skills you want to develop the most – You’re not going to become a master in your field overnight, and a lot of interns make the mistake of trying to develop as many skills as possible. Instead, focus on one or two key skills and hone these.
  4. Ask for a reference letter – You should always seek a reference letter from your internship placement. You will be able to use this reference letter when you apply for any jobs in the future, and it will validate that you are a good candidate for the position.
  5. Have a positive attitude – It is normal to feel apprehensive, nervous or even a little bit shy when you experience your first internship. After all, you’re taking a step into the unknown. But, it is important to have a positive attitude. You should be enthusiastic and willing to take on any task that is thrown your way, irrespective of how tedious it may seem.
  6. Network and socialise – When doing the summer internships abroad, the importance of networking and socialising cannot be undervalued. You will meet key individuals that can potentially grow your career. This is especially the case when you engage in an international internship, such as a London or Hong Kong internship from Elite Intern. Your contact book will become global, and this can really benefit you in the future.
  7. Be professional and stay focused on what you want to do – It is vital to remain professional and focused at all times. Don’t get distracted by your mobile phone or Facebook.
  8. Talk to your manager and ask for feedback – You will never be able to progress if you do not get a true reflection of your current performance. It is vital to talk to your manager so you can receive constructive criticism that will help you to continue to grow and improve.

Author Bio
Andrew Ho

Andrew Ho

Andrew is the Co-founder of Elite Intern, an international internship placement agency with our base in Hong Kong and operations in London, Shanghai and New York. Elite Intern’s internship program covers more than 20 industries and 5000 employers. It strives to offer students the top internships to advance their career and personal development.


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Online Job Search Websites

There are different ways to finding a job, one of which is through the Internet. Job sites, forums and boards are not in short supply online. However, some of these sites are more reputable and helpful than some others. Here we present some top job sites you can use for your next job search — in no particular order.

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Jobs For 16 Year Olds

Category : Internships , My First Job

Jobs For 16 Year Olds

The good news is that at 16, you are just starting your career, and you can get some seriously valuable experience if you know what kind of jobs to take. In fact, if you are the sort of person who has already proven quite talented at something, don’t put that on hold to start working in an office or restaurant. Try to think of a way to make that talent work for yourself in a setting where you get paid for it.

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Advice Survey Results

Advice Survey Results

Welcome to the survey section of myfirstpaycheck.com where you can find advice from experienced members of the workforce or contribute your own.


Justin Guerra’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Selling newspapers

How did you find that first job?
Through an ad in the newspaper

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Location, distance from home, and hours of work.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
Be polite. Be respectful. Dress nice.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It helped me gain experience and learn what is expected in a workplace

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Have a positive attitude. You might not get hired with the first 5 or even 10 applications, but stay in there. Good things happen to those who wait.


Julie Lynn Hohnecker’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Lawn Mowing

How did you find that first job?
Neighbors and my parents.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Networking with other teenagers and family friends.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
To be honest and don’t be afraid to ask questions.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It helped me to be a better person by knowing that I am doing and helping someone else because they are too old to do it themselves.


J. Pelley’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Bailing and stacking hay

How did you find that first job?
My neighbor asked me to help him when I was done bailing my own hay.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Distance, hours, income

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
Make a good first impression. Dress well, not grungy.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
Discipline and endurance.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Don’t try to go for a job you’ve got no chance of getting.


Anonymous’ Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Babysitting

How did you find that first job?
I set out on my street and told all of my neighbors that I was starting a babysitting service and everything took off from there

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Ask yourself, do you enjoy doing this job? Do you make enough money? Is it worth it?

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
The first impression means everything, don’t be late.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
This job has helped me become more responsible.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Think outside the box


Austin’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Yard Work

How did you find that first job?
My older brother worked for a man that my dad works with and still does, my brother worked for him for many years and decided to quit because he found a real job and he asked if I would take his place and after thinking about it, I did.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
You should be careful on the type of job like if you want to make smoothies for a job than you should make sure that they have a good business report and would be in the right level for you to be working in.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
Make sure that you are going to be able to answer the questions given without thinking about them for a while, and speak clearly so they know who there hiring.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
I found that as I got older you are able to interact with that person easier and are able to get the job done and right to make that person happier, and the more work that you do may be hard but after words it would have really been worth it. As you get older you’ll be able to find better ways to spend and more importantly save the money you have made.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
I would definitely try to find a job some where close to home and as you work try to interact with the person you are working with and be positive!


Clorissa’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Babysitting

How did you find that first job?
My mom helped me find jobs.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Don’t give out your information without permission, and if your only a teen, bring an adult with you. Another important thing to remember is body language.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
You should know a lot about the job before you go into it because it might be something you are not capable of.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It taught me some responsibility.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Use good body language and stay in school for any job/career you want. Trust me, school gets you really far in life.


SJ’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Mowing Grass

How did you find that first job?
Through family and friends

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Make eye contact, stand straight, and smile.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
Speak fluently and don’t yell.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It taught me patience.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Do not whine when you don’t get the job you want.


Alisha’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
I worked on an animal farm

How did you find that first job?
I heard about the job from a friend.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Make sure the work is something you are familiar with.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
Make eye contact.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
This job helped make me more responsible in a lot of ways

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Look for a job that your kind of familiar with


Haley’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Babysitter

How did you find that first job?
My aunt was looking for someone to babysit my four cousins so I decided to help.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Make sure you know what the pay and hours are for the job.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
Having a job prepares me for life

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Do your best


George S.’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Intern at engineering firm

How did you find that first job?
Pure luck! My mother was working at a bookstore, and the director of this firm purchased the exact stack of books that I had purchased the previous week. My mother commented on the coincidence, the man offered his business card, and the following week, I had an interview.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Have an open mind!

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Remember the motto of the British Special Air Services: PROPER PLANNING PREVENTS PISS POOR PERFORMANCE. Plan ahead, get there early, and know what you’re walking into.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Even though I will never pursue engineering, the skills I learned at the firm have taught me to think visually, spatially, and mathematically.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
HAVE CONFIDENCE! DO NOT BE AFRAID TO ASK QUESTIONS! THERE ARE NO “STUPID QUESTIONS”


Karyn’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Waitress

How did you find that first job?
I spoke to people at a locally owned little restaurant

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Location (since being on time is really important, and as a teenager I didn’t have my own car when I got my first job) Location (since being on time is really important, and as a teenager I didn’t have my own car when I got my first job) Impressions are really important, dress appropriately, and if you are going to inquire about a job, timing is important…so at a restaurant don’t ask to talk to a manager about a job during a really busy Friday night. When filling out an application make sure you write very carefully (best hand writing and no mistakes).

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Have some knowledge about the company you want to work at, be ready for them to ask you popular questions (like identify a weakness) and be prepared to frame your answers in a way that puts a good spin on it. Also it’s a good idea to think about what question(s) you might want to ask them, because many employers will ask you if you have questions. Punctuality is essential – don’t be late…especially for an interview or your first day. Don’t be afraid to ask questions if you don’t understand something.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Learning how to work with people, and in a restaurant serving people, gave me an understanding for the food business that I still find useful today. When the money you make is directly affected by the work of other people (tips aren’t so good when things are going wrong) you learn to pitch in and help wherever you can. I also think it helped me to multitask and have a good memory, I would suggest that everyone works in the food service industry at some point, it’s a good experience.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Do your homework, look around, and be prepared for it not to be what you expect. People have an average of 7 job changes in their lives, so your first job is most likely not going to be your last. Try to stick it out, and remember that your experiences (good or bad) will follow you when you leave.


Katherine’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Toy Store Clerk

How did you find that first job?
I called the toy store.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Don’t dress messy.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
No, i was fired after 2 weeks

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Don’t dress messy. Be on time.


Sam Blum’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Cold Stone Creamery

How did you find that first job?
I went out and filled out a bunch of applications. Cold Stone called me first, so I took it.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Keep an open mind.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Don’t be nervous. If you’ve gotten the interview, or it’s your first day, your employer thinks you can take on the job. Stay confident, be friendly, and most importantly, be yourself.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
My co-workers have become my great friends. It was my first “adult” experience, as I was able to take on new challenges, try new things, and have a great time making money.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Apply everywhere you can, you can always turn someone down. I got my job before my first paycheck, but if I was first looking now, Myfirstpaycheck.com would be a really great place to start.


Nita’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
baby sitting

How did you find that first job?
asked by a friend

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
find people you can trust and display good work ethic themselves

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
relax, dress nice but comfortably, smile, lean forward, shake hands, be pleasant

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
I love kids and liked finding work involving children… I got a good recommendation too.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Find work that you like so you look forward to going to work.


Lois’ Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
I worked at Pretzel Time in the mall

How did you find that first job?
My friends and I were mall rats. Most of us had jobs at various stores in the mall so we knew the managers and other employees.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
What kind of person do you want to work for? What kind of people do you want to work with?

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Know where you need to go and how to get there, know the dress code, ask questions when you don’t know something.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
The networking I did from that job helped me get jobs for the next four years (even in another city when I went away to college). I still use the networking skills I gained at that job.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Be okay starting at the bottom and working your way up…almost everyone has to do it. Have fun with your job and have fun with the people you work with.


Alberto’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Bagger/Cashier- Acme Supermarket

How did you find that first job?
I decided to get a job last summer, and I applied to Acme online. They called me back several weeks later.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Employers love to here from you. If you apply, wait a week, and then call them back “regarding your application”, it let’s them know that you are confident and assertive. Don’t, however, take this to the extreme and call the day after you apply.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Interview etiquette is pretty straight forward. Be polite, but make sure they know they can’t take advantage of you. Make sure you fully understand the job guidelines as well as the salary you are going to receive.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
If you’re looking for a summer job: -apply early and to many different places, because EVERYBODY is applying at the same time. I recommend starting in March or April. I waited, and I missed about a month of the summer going through the process instead of making money. -Pretty much nobody except beaches and pools wants a worker who will only stay for the summer. They won’t hire you unless you commit for at least through the fall.


Doug’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Fuel Transfer Technician (gas pumper)

How did you find that first job?
I looked on www.myfirstpaycheck.com. Just kidding! That website was just a glimmer in the eye of a bunch of Lavins at that time. The truth is that a kid on my basketball team was quitting and so I took his spot when he left.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Make sure that the job will help you achieve some definite goals, whether they be developing new skills, gaining experience, making money, or whatever. Try to get a job where you are surrounded by a good team of people that will help you and encourage you.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Bring phone numbers for your references. I always forget that one!

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
Being a gas pumper at Sunoco? Hmmm. It’s made me want to ride a bicycle everywhere I go. That’s good, right?

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Go for the gusto. Be bold. Be Sincere.


Max’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Waiter

How did you find that first job?
I was walking around and saw a help wanted sign

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
To be open and not to critical

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Be polite, neat, respectful, and try to not to be nervous and freak out

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
My first job I had a boss who was a an incredibly unhappy person who was always riding me and my fellow employees, working there helped me learn to deal with that kind of situation.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Don’t be to critical, never feel trapped, never work for an establishment that treats you terribly dont be afraind to stick up for yourself


AL in DC’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Receptionist

How did you find that first job?
The easy way, I got a job at my father’s office when I was 16 year old.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
It is important to come to an interview ready to ask questions. Now that I am in a position to hire people, much of my evaluation of candidates’ question about the company and the job.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Before you start ask questions about dress code. Don’t make the mistake of dressing at the lower end of the dress code. Your dress tells your colleagues a great deal about how seriously you take yourself and your job.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
I was lucky that in my first few jobs I worked for people who felt it was their responsibility to teach me good skills and habits. My first boss told me that I should begin to straighten my desk when the clock struck 5 o’clock and not a moment before. I should actively work and not appear to be waiting to race from the office.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Keeping knocking on doors. Job hunting is depressing and discouraging until the day you get the job. You forget the tough times immediately.


Susan Kilborn’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Assistant in the local public library

How did you find that first job?
I was in the library alot and asked if they needed summer help.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Try to think what you like to do most and try to get a job doing that or around other people who are doing it in a support capacity. Persistence is almost always a winner. Keep checking back, dropping by and emailing the place where you really WANT to work. Once you get a job there, ask for help. Ask for feedback. Ask for more responsibility if you see an opportunity for it. Work and SMILE.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
I jumped the gun and answered this one up above.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
I still love libraries.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Ask questions. Try to learn something about the place where you work before you get there. such as asking for the roster of personnelle so you can start learning the names of the people who work there. Volunteer for work if you don’t have anything to do. Don’t just sit there!


Emily’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Tennis instructor

How did you find that first job?
through my tennis coach

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
make sure you do something you love

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
dress professionally, arrive early

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It taught me discipline

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Do your research!


Steve in Seattle’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Window Washer

How did you find that first job?
I teamed up with a buddy and we brought squeegee’s and soap and a bucket to an outdoor strip mall and told each store that we were real experienced, and finally an art store hired us on a regular basis. I think we got a couple more stores, and after a couple weeks we actually got pretty good at window washing.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
If you depend on walking or bicycling, or the bus or mom & dad to drive you, consider the convenience of the place you are selecting. Pay attention to the workers already there who you might have to work with. You might ask them, without letting the boss hear you, how long they have worked there, and do they like it. If you sense that three or four people have recently left, and that everyone there is somewhat new, then the “turn over” is high, and the boss might be a grouch, or expect more work out of you than what the job desciption says.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Well, I am no longer a teen. But I was a teen once. I would suggest making a great first impression on the one in charge of hiring you. Give them eye contact and a firm handshake, and try not to look down like you are shy or frightened, even if you are. If they ask your name, say it clearly as though you are proud of your name. And yes, dress a bit fancier than what will be expected if hired. You can always roll up your sleeves when they get comfortable with you, but if you start out dressed too casual, it is hard to become more formal at that point. The hardest part of an interview in your situation might be if your future boss decides to engage you in small talk, such as, “How about those Eagles?” or…”What music do you listen to?” It can get tricky, but just be aware in advance that you might have to say something about sports or music or a certain movie or TV show. I would advise you to pretend to first take interest in what team or TV show your future boss likes, then agree with their taste, or say, “My parents like the same thing you do.” It is less about what you answer, than how. Grown-ups just want to feel like their teen employees will be able to carry on an intelligent conversation, and not steal from them. If the interviewer says anything that seems the slightest bit inappropiate or too personal, remember not everything is their business, and it would be best to politely excuse yourself and look for work elsewhere.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?Regardless of your age, the bottom line is you are costing your boss money if you get hired. They have something you want, or need, and it pays to smile and be respectful to them.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
If you are handed a job application, offer three or more “character” references, as you will not yet have any job references. The best character references come from local business owners, politicians, priests, rabbis, and ministers, who are well established. Perhaps you are regular customers at a local grocery store, car repair place, or nursery, and have gone in with your mother or father, or friend. Or a dentist, or alderman is your neighbor, and you go to school with their kids. You can ask them permission to put their name and business/occupation and number down on your job application. It really “beefs it up,” and, again, gives the impression you are honest, not spacy, and won’t take drugs…the stuff older folks who own businesses have concerns about when they think “teen.”


Ari S’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Working at the Narberth Cheese Company as a sales associate.

How did you find that first job?
All I did was walk around town and look for “Help Wanted” signs. When you see them, I went into the store and asked for an application.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?

  1. Location: It has to be easy and cheap for you to get to.
  2. Your Commitment: You have to know how much time you are able to work and be honest about it.
  3. Your Capability: Can you see yourself working at the place you are applying? Meaning is it over your head or not, and are you able to stand doing it You don’t have to like it, but that would be a plus. Also, when you go to ask for an application it would be great if you did not look like a slob. First impressions are key.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Once again, don’t look like a slob when you go to the interview. If you feel like it, dress up a little…it never hurts. And for the first day (and maybe even first month) don’t get hung up on little things that you mess up. You’re new, you’ll be corrected, and then you move on.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?The Cheese Company has been a great experience for me. In fact, I’m still there (I’ve only been there for a year though). I do everything from sales, to inventory, to janitor…ing. I have met a lot of people and learned about many things, not all of which are about cheese.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?

  1. If you are applying for the summer, don’t wait until the end of school.
  2. Most places will require working papers, so get those from your school’s main office or guidance office.
  3. Be practical about where you are going to work
  4. Not to sound too lame, but try to have a little fun with it…if that’s at all possible.

Mark’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
I taught swimming to kids at the local YMCA.

How did you find that first job?
The assistant coach to my high school swim team worked there.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?

  1. Find a job that you can get to without relying on someone else.
  2. It’s your first job, not a career. So, although it’s always best to do something interesting, don’t sweat it if it’s not.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?

Interview:

  1. Be serious, but also yourself at the interview. They’re usually more interested in whether you’ll fit in than whether you know how to do the job, especially when we’re talking first job-type stuff like cashier, line cook, etc.
  2. Dress to impress. You should be dressed about one notch fancier than what you would actually wear to the job.

First day:

  1. Show up early. It shows you’re responsible and gives you time to get the lay of the land.
  2. Dress to impress. Just like #2 above. It shows you’re serious. You can dress down on your second or third day.

Employment:

Remember, the reason it’s called work and it’s something you’re paid to do is because it’s not always fun. Even rock stars hate their jobs some days.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?

Teaching is actually something I’ve done on and off ever since my first job. So I guess that I lucked out and found something that I really enjoy doing.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?

Pound the pavement and don’t be disappointed if you get turned down the first few times.


Ari’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Working at Thrift Drug as a cashier
How did you find that first job?
I walked around looking for summer jobs until I found it.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
As a teen? Get as much money as you can because anything you do will be fairly dull.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Make sure you are clean and well dressed, always be enthusiastic about everything

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
Back then I learned how to deal with customers and today, I still deal with them, only now, I call them clients.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
At this young age, follow the money.


Ronn’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
McDonald’s Cashier

How did you find that first job?
I walked in and asked them if they hired 14-year-olds (Nowhere else did)

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Are you going to be able to be cheerful at the job? How badly do you need the money? Could you get something better? Remember, this isn’t a career.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Try to seem independent, despite being dependent on your parents. Just act intelligent. A place like McDonalds doesn’t care about your skills or anything.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
I know I never want to work as a cashier. I value money in terms of hours of McDonalds work now.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Your best bet as someone with no experience is to get a job through a relative.


Josh’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Soccer Referee

How did you find that first job?
A friend of mine was doing it, and I asked him how I could get involved

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
You’ve got to be realistic about logistics, including how many hours you can work (and want to work). It’s nice to make money, but you if you spend all of your time in school and then at work, you’re going to miss out on a lot of enjoyment. Remember, the older you get, the more you end up working and you have less time for yourself.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Take everything seriously. Employers look for maturity and a sense of responsibility.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
As a referee you take a lot of criticism, no matter how good you are. It was important for me to learn how to take criticism (even though it may not be constructive). I also learned to stay confident in the face of criticism.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Find something you like to do or are interested in and see if there is any way to get paid while being involved in it. For me, I loved playing soccer, so I looked for ways to get paid while being around the game. If you get into the habit of working for money, you will always just be working for money. But if you get into the habit of getting paid for doing what you like to do, you will end up much happier.


Austin’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Mowing Lawns and Shoveling Snow

How did you find that first job?
Went to neighbors who I knew, talked to my parents friends, friend’s parents, anywhere where I could walk

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?

It’s important to find something that you enjoy because it’ll make working easier. I liked being outside and having control of my own hours so landscaping was never hard.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?

Show them that you want the job, and be capable of your own abilities. Most kids have worked in some capacity; babysitting, petsitting, yardwork, etc. remember that you are capable of handling the responsibility, and than make sure you do a good job.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It helped me get the next job and the job after. I was able to take on a big landscaping project for a neighbor and a friend that involved multiple days and hiring my brothers, but I knew I could do the job, and I could it cheaper than a professional landscaper. I was also able to use that experience to obtain my first salaried position, at a plant nursery.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Be persistent. If you aren’t getting rejected, you’re not trying hard enough.


Nick’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Receptionist at a Law Firm

How did you find that first job?
A friend of the family worked there

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
It’s important to remember how the expenses of getting to the job, etc, are going to effect the amount of $ you take home – for example, one place may pay more than another, but it’s so far away that the expenses of the commute kind of even the salaries out.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
If you act like you don’t want to be there, you’re not going to be there for long.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It’s helped me realize that I never want another job that requires me to answer phones with the same line, all day long.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
You’re probably not going to get a job that you actually like – welcome to the world of work.


Bracha’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Working at the Mall of America for Gapkids (and spending all of the money I made at gap–great discount!)

How did you earn that first job?
I knew a friend that had started there so i was able to get an interview

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
It’s important to know how you’ll get there and back every shift, if you will be able to work the number of hours you want, if you will be able to make “enough” money, how the boss is, how the staff is, the perks, etc.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
It’s important to present yourself well, which usually means dressing up a little bit, not chewing gum, cell phone off. It’s important to maintain open communication so if you have a question about the first day, or any day, that you ask your supervisor. Better to ask than to try to figure it out yourself

How has that job helped you as you grew older?
It helped me get my second job, which helped me get my third job, etc. also, I think that at some point everyone should work in the service industry (retail, restaurants, theme parks) because even though people can get rude, if you can handle the crowd you can handle any assignment further down the line.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for their first job?
Use any connections from friends or family members that you might have (or websites that cater to first time employees!), don’t get discouraged if not everyone is hiring, or they do not hire you. Find the places that are hiring, drop off applications, ask when you should expect a call, and follow up by that time by calling to talk to the manager.



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Advice

Looking for Resume Guide and Tips? Click Here!

We’re here to help teenagers find jobs. It’s tough to earn that first paycheck, but we’re here to make it easier.

Learning how to apply for jobs isn’t something we always learn in school, but it’s an important skill. It’s especially important as a teen applying for your first job to make a good first impression, and Myfirstpaycheck.com can help.

Check out our five quick job searching tips below:

1. Be Brave. Even in this economy, there are plenty of employers out there looking for the affordable, enthusiastic, and energetic help that teenagers provide, but you have to go out and ask for it.  Don’t be afraid to apply for jobs.

2.  Be Polite. You are applying for a job; dress up, make eye contact, shake hands, and avoid using slang. First impressions matter – make sure you are remembered for your application and not your attitude.

3. Be Prepared. Bring a resume and a cover letter whenever you apply for a job. Having a good resume is essential. It shows that you are serious about the position, and that you are mature and responsible. If you need help writing a resume, myfirstpaycheck.com provides a dynamic free resume for teens
that is very helpful.

4. Be Persistent. It would be nice if you were immediately offered every job that you ever applied for, unfortunately this is not the case for anybody. Persistence pays off; send a thank you note to interviewers, follow-up if you do not hear about the job after a week, and keep applying.

5. Be Creative. Look for work in places other than the mall. The weakening economy means that people are going to be looking to cut costs in areas such as lawn and child care. Get a few friends together and start a landscaping or a babysitting business. Working for yourself is a great way to earn money and develop skills that will help you find your next job.

We have surveyed our friends and colleagues to find out how that got that first job and what advice they have for today’s teens. Read what they had to say.



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Jobs For Younger Teens

Category : My First Job

But I’m Too Young! – Jobs for Younger Teens

Myfirstpaycheck.com was created to help young people get jobs. We have job advice for teens, interview tips, a resume builder, etc. But the one thing we can’t help you with is changing an employer’s mind. What if he just won’t hire someone younger than 16? He has that right, and most employers will not hire students that young. So what are the young and restless to do?

Well, if nobody will hire you, hire yourselves! Do what I did, start your own business. It doesn’t have to be a high flying website; you could start a landscaping company, or a babysitting service. Get a couple of friends together and offer lawn-mowing or snow-shoveling. Or you could tutor even younger kids. If you can’t get hired for a payed job, consider volunteer work. It is satisfying and contributory (to your community and your future resume). You can help out at religious school or at an homeless or animal shelter. Be sure to also consider starting a career as a model and movie extra, which you can do at any age. People everywhere are looking for volunteers, and young people can fill that void (even 14 year olds!)

You can also make money in your spare time

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Job Resources for Teens

Category : My First Job

Finding a job can be hard, but knowing the laws behind working can be even harder. Myfirstpaycheck.com is here to help.

While every state has slightly similar regulations, the following are some links from the federal department of labor that provide a good overview.

Check them out for more information, and remember you don’t have to stay in a job that makes you feel uncomfortable or work for a boss that makes you feel uneasy.

The following laws are meant to protect you. Make sure you know your rights.

  • Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA): General overview and help Navigating DOL Laws and Regulations
  • Youth in the Workplace: More specific information regarding child labor regulations and helpful shortcuts.
  • YouthRules! This department of Labor’s initiative seeks to promote positive and safe work experiences for young workers.

More specific subtopics for further investigation:



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SAT Myths and Tips

Category : College , My First Job

4 SAT Myths

MYTH #1: The SAT is a test of intelligence and my scores are a good indication of how I will do in college.

FACT: Your SAT scores reflect how good you are at taking the SAT (as well as how much time you spent preparing)–and that’s about it. Nevertheless, admissions officers continue to place great weight on this test. So it’s important to do well.

MYTH #2: The SAT tests complex math concepts.

FACT: SAT math can seem challenging because of the way the concepts are tested, not because of the concepts themselves. The math sections include concepts you learned in the seventh or eighth grade, like arithmetic, basic geometry, basic algebra and algebra II. You won’t see any calculus or trigonometry on the SAT.

MYTH #3: You can’t really improve your Critical Reading score.

FACT: You can improve your Critical Reading score by expanding your vocabulary. Reading comprehension and sentence completions all rely upon your understanding of the words in the questions and answer choices. So read books, newspapers and anything else you can get your hands on, and check out our SAT prep for additional vocabulary-building tools.

MYTH #4: It’s better to leave a question blank than to guess.

FACT: Not necessarily. You receive one point for every correct answer, zero points for every question you leave unanswered and minus one-quarter of a point for every incorrect answer If you can eliminate even one of the answer choices, guess! From a purely statistical standpoint, this approach will gain you more points over the whole test than you’ll get by playing it safe and leaving the questions blank.

 

3 SAT Tips

We’re not big fans of the SAT.  It doesn’t measure intelligence.  It can’t possibly measure your future success in college.  The SAT measures one thing, and one thing only: how good you are at taking the SAT.

That’s good news! It means you don’t have to be a genius to improve your score. You simply have to understand how the exam works.

Here are three SAT tips to help you be a smart test-taker:

Know the order of difficulty.

SAT questions can be divided into three levels of difficulty: easy, medium and hard. The questions in the first third of each section are easy, those in the second third are medium and those in the last third are hard. (The only exception is the Reading Comprehension passages, which do not follow this order.)

Every question on the SAT is worth an equal amount. So spend your time making sure you get the easy and medium questions correct and tackle the hard questions if time remains.  Rushing through the test to get to the hardest questions will only drag your score down.

Don’t be Joe.

Joe Bloggs is your average student.  He gets the average score, 500, on each section.  He gets all of the easy questions correct; he gets some of the medium questions correct; he gets all of the hard questions wrong.

Why is this important to you?  Because our friend Joe is predictable.  He gets all of the easy questions right because the choices that look correct are correct.  He gets all of the hard questions wrong because the choices that look correct are wrong.  If you know what Joe will do, you can make better decisions!

If you’re working on an easy question, the answer that seems right probably is.  If you’re working on a hard question, the answer that seems right is always wrong.  Use this strategy to help you eliminate choices for difficult questions.

Use the process of elimination.

Don’t know the right answer?  It happens.  But if know which choices are definitely wrong (see above), you significantly improve your chances of getting the question right.

Each question has five possible choices.  Eliminate one or more possibilities, and your chances of guessing correctly are 25% or better.  An incorrect guess will cost you only a quarter of a point.  A correct guess will add an entire point.

Let’s say there are 8 questions where you eliminate 1 choice and guess among the remaining 4 choices.  Statistically, you will guess correctly 2 times and incorrectly 6 times.  You are rewarded 2 points and penalized 1.5 points.  You just earned .5 points from guessing.  Congrats—you’ve improved your score!



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Improving Your ACT or SAT Score

Category : College , My First Job

If you are considering a selective college, odds are that you must take one of two standardized tests: the ACT or SAT. Along with your grades, colleges pay a lot of attention to your scores on these tests. So the stakes are high.

It may seem unfair that you have four years of high school to earn your grades, but only four hours on a Saturday to generate your test scores.  We understand, and we’re here to tell you that a little preparation can avert potential disappointment.

You need three pieces of information to prepare for the ACT or SAT: (1) the score you have (2) the score you want and (3) a plan to close the gap.

The ACT or SAT Score You Have

Take a practice test and take it seriously.  Establish exam-like conditions.  Do each section successively and time yourself.  Take a short break if you need to, but don’t stop for lunch. The ACT and SAT are endurance tests.

Now, consider that score your baseline. This is the score you would earn if you showed up at the exam site today.

The ACT or SAT Score You Want

Compare your baseline with the range from the incoming freshmen class at any of your prospective schools.

Unless your score far exceeds the average at all of your prospective schools, expect to spend a fair amount of time preparing before the real test. Improving your score by even a hundred points can significantly improve your chances of admission at many schools.

A Plan to Close the Gap

To improve your baseline score, you’ll need to determine the problem.

You’re careless Did you miss questions because you didn’t read carefully? If so, you need to practice and drill.
You’re crunched Did you miss questions because you ran out of time? If so, you need to work on pacing.
You’re clueless Did you miss questions because you had no idea how to answer? If so, you need to focus on a content review.

 

Finally, it’s time to find the solution that works best for you. We recommend The Princeton Review’s ACT and SAT test preparation resources (sure, we’re a little biased). Whatever approach you choose, start planning well in advance. You’ll do better if you set aside time each week to prepare rather than cramming it all in at the last minute.



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What’s a Good SAT Score or ACT Score

Category : College , My First Job

What’s a Good SAT Score or ACT Score?

So, you just received your SAT or ACT scores and you’re not sure whether you should crack open that ’72 sparkling cider or immediately register for the next test date. Well, it all depends on the colleges you are considering.  A 23 on the ACT or a 1800 on the SAT may be above average at one university but below average at another.  The higher your score, the more options are open to you.

The Higher, the Better

The national average for the new SAT is 1500. For the ACT, it’s between 20 and 21. If you are close to these averages you will likely be accepted into a considerable number of colleges and universities (as long as you have decent grades), but may not be considered at more selective schools.  Above average SAT/ACT scores will improve your chances of getting into a more selective school.

Scores below an 1100 on the SAT or a 15 on ACT are considered low at just about any four-year college. You can overcome low scores with good grades or an outstanding application. But even if you’re accepted by a four-year college, the school may advise or require you to take some remedial courses as a freshman.

Not sure where you stand? Most colleges publish admission data regarding the previous year’s freshman class. Check out the range of scores.

Room for Improvement

Unless you pulled in a perfect 2400 or 36, you can always improve your score.  Some students are confident that their numbers are high enough to get them into the college of their choice. But unless you’re an honorary member of the admissions committee, you never know.

A good SAT score or ACT score can also help you snag additional scholarship money.  Even if you have already been accepted to a college, you may want to consider taking the test again (say, in December or January of senior year) for that reason.



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About the ACT

Category : College , My First Job

ACT Test Information

Most colleges require students to take a standardized exam as part of the admissions process; either the ACT or the SAT. While there are many similarities, as a curriculum-based test, the ACT test is more straightforward than the SAT, and you can take the ACT several times and choose which score to submit.

What’s On The ACT

The ACT has 4 tests: English, Reading, Math and Science, as well as, an optional 30 minute essay. Some schools may require the essay, so be sure to ask before you take the test. 

The weight placed on ACT scores varies from school to school. Other important factors that schools consider in their admissions decisions are your high school GPA, academic transcript, letters of recommendation, interviews, and personal essays.

For more specific information on the importance of ACT scores at the schools to which you are applying, contact the admissions offices at those schools.

When to Take The ACT

The ACT test is offered nationally every year in October, December, February, April, and June. It is also given in September in select cities. 

Students have traditionally taken the ACT in the spring of their junior year and, if necessary, again in the fall of their senior year. However, more and more students are choosing to take their first ACT earlier, such as during the fall of their junior year. This gives them more flexibility to retake the ACT test one or more times, or to take the SAT or SAT Subject Tests.



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First Jobs For Teens

Category : My First Job

Where to start looking for jobs

When you’re a teenager you begin to realize that money indeed does make the world go round and unfortunately it doesn’t grow on trees. When this realization sinks is when you may want to consider looking for a job. Your first job doesn’t have to be anything glamorous. In fact, you should take advantage of the fact that you can try whatever occupation out. When you’re 35 working at a fast-food restaurant may not be as socially acceptable. When you’re young the job market is at your fingertips and you can be as unfocused as you like.

What to look for

When you start looking for a job you can make some decisions. Do you want it to be part time or full time? What kind of time do you have to dedicate towards this new job? What are you interests? Do you want to work alone or do you want it to be a social job? What kind of ambient would you like to be working in (indoor or outdoor). Once you begin to answer these questions you can make a more education decision about where to begin your job search.

Lifeguard

For many teenagers a great first job is a lifeguard. First of all, you mainly work in the summer (depending where in the U.S. you live) so it won’t interfere with school. Also, it’s a social job that’s fun as well as pays money, so it’ll begin to acclimate you to a working environment. Second, you learn valuable lessons and have to get certified in order to begin. This of course means investing a certain amount of money before beginning, but you’ll make it back and be certified for years. Plus, life-saving techniques are great skills you’ll be able to use even outside the job. In many cases you’ll be better prepared for other jobs if you have that kind of certification. A lifeguard job is also one where you have the opportunity to work year round. If you like the job, just about every hotel has an indoor pool that needs lifeguards. Big recreational clubs usually also have pools that are always in need of people to watch over the area.

Camp Jobs

Another great job is working as a camp counselor. Again, it’s a job that takes place over the summer but can give you working skills you’ll use for the rest of your life. There are many opportunities to get to know your community while working at camps. You have to learn to be patient with children and even more patient with their parents. You get to spend your time outdoors, which are also skills you’ll use in later life. Not many people are so fortunate to have jobs where they can enjoy the great outdoors. It’s a great idea to take advantage of that while you’re younger and see where you can develop a personal occupation from there. Even if it’s not something you want to do in the future, it’s fun and it’s a great way to save some bills.

When you realize you’d like some extra pocket change start looking into these fun and active jobs. They can help you save money and give your summers some direction.



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Using Your Time More Efficiently While Working

Category : My First Job

When you’re young and in school, the last thing you’ll want to do is work when the day finishes.  You probably feel like you spend all day learning and just want to have some time for yourself.  Contrary to popular belief, having a part time job apart from your everyday activities may actually help you to utilize your time more efficiently.  When you have more to do, you are forced to learn how to manage the time that you have.  If you think that having a part time job apart from school will make you procrastinate even more, think again and give having a job a try.

Having a part time job after school can only help teenagers.  One of the biggest benefits to having a job apart from school is learning how to more efficiently and effectively manage your time.  If you have from 3:00 pm until you go to bed to do whatever you want, you often put off doing your homework until the last minute.  During the school day, you probably use your recess and free time to talk with your friends and take a break from school.   But if you know that after school you have to go to work and may not have much time to study, you will probably plan ahead and work hard to get all your assignments done in a timely fashion.

Furthermore, having an after school job provides you with much more than just time management skills.  Your first job is often the first time that you have authority above you other than your parents.  Learning how to follow rules and regulations gives you experience other than just work experience.  You will learn how to obey authority and be disciplined.  As a teenager, this is a valuable lesson that must be learned before adulthood.

Another way that having a job as a teenager is valuable is learning responsibility.  The first time that children earn their own money, they can learn to appreciate the value of the dollar and how to spend it on the things that have importance.  As most teenagers depend on their parents for much support, learning how to budget and manage their spending is priceless.

A final way that having a job at a young age is beneficial is pure experience.  Often, after high school, employers begin to look for previous work experience when hiring employees.  Whether your job is in construction, a restaurant or an office job, having work experience will always help you.  Furthermore, future employers will have references to contact in order to see what kind of an employee you are.  If you are a good employee, this will always help you in getting a job.

As long as your grades do not drop and you can maintain a social life with your friends and family, getting a part-time job after school only has benefits.  You will learn to manage your time, take on responsibility and get job experience.



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Teen Summer Jobs

Category : My First Job

During June, July and August, many high school students start the job search in order to save money that will hopefully last them their entire year.   As most live with their parents and are provided food for the months they are in school, a teenager’s expenses are minimal.  Because of this, working for three months can often provide a teenager with enough spending money for the entire year.  There are several jobs for teenagers that are specifically meant for the summer season and require little to no previous experience.  Some are aimed towards boys, some towards girls and some for anybody who may be looking for a job.

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First Summer Jobs For Teens

Category : My First Job

Working at Summer Camps

For many teenagers, the summer in between school years is a time when they decide to have their first job.  There are many fun and interesting jobs for teens out there depending on where you live and what you are interested in.  So, if you are thinking about getting a summer job then its best to start looking before the school year has come to a close. 

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Jobs For 13 Year Olds

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Category : My First Job

While younger teens might not be able to legally take on part-time work in larger establishments, that doesn’t mean that there aren’t more than enough jobs for 13 year olds out there for those that go beyond babysitting. After all, a little bit of creativity can pay off big when it comes to your bank account! And there’s never been a better time to start brainstorming about what sort of part-time work you can manage, what companies you can work for, and how you will land that job.

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Tips For Teens On Their First Interview

Category : My First Job

The first time you go into an interview can be an intimidating experience. Remember, though, this is a rite of passage that every teenager must endure. Even more, the person sitting across the table has almost definitely been in the other chair, sweating and nervous as they try to attain their first job. Below, we’ve listed some tips for doing great on your first interview.

Dress to Impress: You don’t have to wear a business suit, but you should take the time to prepare clothing that presents your best side. Think business casual; for guys, a pair of slacks and a collared shirt works well, and girls can’t go wrong with a skirt and a nice sweater. If you’re not sure how dressed up to get, err on the side of caution and dress up, rather than down.

Arrive Early: Plan to get to the interview at least 15 minutes early. Aside from the obvious negatives that go with showing up late, if you’re hurried on the way to the interview, it will only add to your stress level. Make sure you have the proper amount of time to get there safely, taking into account things like traffic and the walk over from your car. There’s nothing wrong with getting there a little early.

Practice Before the Big Day: Enlist a friend or family member to act as the interviewer. Draw up a list of the possible questions they might ask, and run through the answers a few times to get comfortable. It’s a great idea to start this the week before the interview itself, instead of trying to cram it all in the hour before the big event. If certain sections of the interview are giving you problems, run through them multiple times to get a good grip.

Bring Multiple Copies of Your Resume: This is a great way to show a potential employer that you’re responsible and prepared. Rather than having to shuffle papers across a desk, bring a couple of copies so that you can consult your CV at the same time as the interviewer.

Maintain Composure: There’s nothing more unnerving than an interviewee who can’t sit still. Don’t fidget, don’t cross and uncross your legs throughout, just relax. Maintain good body posture, and you’ll convey confidence and self-respect, two things that any boss is sure to appreciate in an employee.

Take a Deep Breath: During the interview, if you feel yourself starting to lose control, just take a deep breath and compose yourself. There’s no reason to feel anxious; even if you don’t get this job, there are plenty of opportunities down the road, and now you’ll be much better prepared.

Interviewing is a skill that you’ll have to embrace as you move through life, so why not start early? By embracing the tips above, you’ll have a great head start on the interviewing process, and you’ll be much more likely to get that job that you’ve been dreaming of.




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Building a Teen Resume For Your First Job

Category : Interviews , My First Job

Your first job is always a memorable one. Most kids start searching for those summer jobs early and are already working by the time they are teenagers. It can be hard trying to find the perfect job because as a kid you have so many other activities such as school, sports and extra curriculars. However, there are a lot of valuable lessons you can learn from your first job and build your resume. The best part is as a teenager you have room to look around and decide what job works with your schedule and is a fun way to make money.

The first job search is usually found by word of mouth or with the help of other friends who have some experience. Many times teenagers begin working over the summers in order to make some money while they don’t have the commitment of school. With a good employer you can hopefully find a way to work a part-time job into your school year as well. As a rule of thumb, when you go in for the interview process you should make your potential employer aware if you will or will not be able to consider continue working during the school year as well.

As a teenager searching for a job you need to be a little more flexible about what you are going to find. As you are just starting, you are on the bottom of the totem pole when it comes to pay and experience. No matter how smart and capable you are of the job, it’s hard to convince someone of your talent without any previous experience. That’s why in your first job you should be looking to build your resume and experience. A great way to do that is by beginning to write your resume even before you start your job. That way as you are completing tasks it’ll be fresh in your mind of all the new tools you are learning. You’ll be surprised by how many different little skills you learn that maybe later you wouldn’t even consider writing on your resume. For example, if you are using any sort of computer program that’s definitely experience you want to include. Even if it is only for helping customers to check out that is experience not everyone has had and the next time you are looking for a job it may be able to give you leverage over your competition.

It’s incredible how important that resume will be in later years when you are searching for another job. A well-written and organized resume can definitely get you the job over another potential candidate. Plus, you automatically are in a better place than with your first occupation because you have actually job experience. Even if your second choice of job has nothing to do with the first, any experience is always better than no experience at all. Take your first job for what it is and begin to build your resume as you go.